AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 267–279

Changes in Attitudes Toward Antiviral Medication: A Comparison of Women Living with HIV/AIDS in the Pre-HAART and HAART Eras

Authors

    • Center for the Psychosocial Study of Health and Illness, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
    • Center for the Psychosocial Study of Health and Illness, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
  • Karolynn Siegel
    • Center for the Psychosocial Study of Health and Illness, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
  • Helen-Maria Lekas
    • Center for the Psychosocial Study of Health and Illness, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia University
Behavioral Changes in the Era of Combination Therapies

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-005-9001-6

Cite this article as:
Schrimshaw, E.W., Siegel, K. & Lekas, H. AIDS Behav (2005) 9: 267. doi:10.1007/s10461-005-9001-6

To examine potential changes in attitudes toward antiviral medication since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), focused interviews were conducted with two samples of women living with HIV/AIDS; one in the pre-HAART era (1994–1996) and a second matched sample in the HAART era (2000–2003). Women in the pre-HAART era held highly negative attitudes toward antiviral medications, perceived them as ineffective with few benefits and viewed side effects as intolerable. In contrast, women in the HAART era were less likely to report negative attitudes, which were balanced by more frequent reports of perceived benefits and more likely to view side effects as temporary and manageable. African American women in both eras were more likely to hold negative attitudes and less likely to perceive benefits than White and Puerto Rican women. These findings suggest that views of antiviral medication have improved since the advent of HAART, but that negative attitudes and side-effect concerns remain which should be addressed in interventions to promote treatment acceptance and adherence.

KEY WORDS:

HAART attitudes perceived effectiveness side effects ethnic/racial differences

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005