AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 145–154

Multiple Dimensions of HIV Stigma and Psychological Distress Among Asians and Pacific Islanders Living With HIV Illness

Authors

    • HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral StudiesNew York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University
    • Department of Pediatric PsychiatryColumbia-Presbyterian Center of New York Presbyterian Hospital
    • Research ScientistHIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University
  • Bruce D. Rapkin
    • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral ScienceMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • Robert H. Remien
    • HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral StudiesNew York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University
  • Claude Ann Mellins
    • HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral StudiesNew York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University
    • Department of Pediatric PsychiatryColumbia-Presbyterian Center of New York Presbyterian Hospital
  • Alina Oh
    • Department of Professional Psychology and Family TherapySeton Hall University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-005-3896-9

Cite this article as:
Kang, E., Rapkin, B.D., Remien, R.H. et al. AIDS Behav (2005) 9: 145. doi:10.1007/s10461-005-3896-9

Abstract

Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs) living with HIV/AIDS in the US are particularly vulnerable to HIV-related stigma largely due to ingrained socio-cultural norms that strongly associate HIV transmission with activities perceived to be immoral. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between five HIV-stigma factors and psychological distress among 54 HIV-seropositive APIs. Social Rejection, Negative Self-Worth, Perceived Interpersonal Insecurity, and Financial Security were all significantly associated with psychological distress. Results from hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that Social Rejection, Negative Self-Worth, and Perceived Interpersonal Insecurity significantly predicted psychological distress after control for physical symptoms and country of birth. Undocumented Asians endorsed higher levels of Social Rejection, Negative Self-Worth and Perceived Interpersonal Insecurity than documented APIs. Future studies examining mechanisms of psychological distress among HIV-seropositive APIs are needed.

Key words

stigma Asians Pacific Islanders HIV/AIDS

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005