Annals of Biomedical Engineering

, Volume 39, Issue 6, pp 1608–1619

Fluid Flow Mechanotransduction in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Fibroblasts


DOI: 10.1007/s10439-011-0309-2

Cite this article as:
Shi, ZD. & Tarbell, J.M. Ann Biomed Eng (2011) 39: 1608. doi:10.1007/s10439-011-0309-2


Understanding how vascular wall endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and fibroblasts (FBs) sense and transduce the stimuli of hemodynamic forces (shear stress, cyclic strain, and hydrostatic pressure) into intracellular biochemical signals is critical to prevent vascular disease development and progression. ECs lining the vessel lumen directly sense alterations in blood flow shear stress and then communicate with medial SMCs and adventitial FBs to regulate vessel function and disease. Shear stress mechanotransduction in ECs has been extensively studied and reviewed. In the case of endothelial damage, blood flow shear stress may directly act on the superficial layer of SMCs and transmural interstitial flow may be elevated on medial SMCs and adventitial FBs. Therefore, it is also important to investigate direct shear effects on vascular SMCs as well as FBs. The work published in the last two decades has shown that shear stress and interstitial flow have significant influences on vascular SMCs and FBs. This review summarizes work that considered direct shear effects on SMCs and FBs and provides the first comprehensive overview of the underlying mechanisms that modulate SMC secretion, alignment, contraction, proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and migration in response to 2-dimensional (2D) laminar, pulsatile, and oscillating flow shear stresses and 3D interstitial flow. A mechanistic model of flow sensing by SMCs is also provided to elucidate possible mechanotransduction pathways through surface glycocalyx, integrins, membrane receptors, ion channels, and primary cilia. Understanding flow-mediated mechanotransduction in SMCs and FBs and the interplay with ECs should be helpful in exploring strategies to prevent flow-initiated atherosclerosis and neointima formation and has implications in vascular tissue engineering.


Shear stressInterstitial flowMechanobiologyFlow sensingGlycocalyxEndothelial cellVascular lesion formation3-DimensionalTissue engineering

Copyright information

© Biomedical Engineering Society 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Developmental Biology ProgramSloan-Kettering InstituteNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringThe City College of New YorkNew YorkUSA