EcoHealth

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 109–119

Risks of Avian Influenza Transmission in Areas of Intensive Free-Ranging Duck Production with Wild Waterfowl

  • Julien Cappelle
  • Delong Zhao
  • Marius Gilbert
  • Martha I. Nelson
  • Scott H. Newman
  • John Y. Takekawa
  • Nicolas Gaidet
  • Diann J. Prosser
  • Ying Liu
  • Peng Li
  • Yuelong Shu
  • Xiangming Xiao
Feature

DOI: 10.1007/s10393-014-0914-2

Cite this article as:
Cappelle, J., Zhao, D., Gilbert, M. et al. EcoHealth (2014) 11: 109. doi:10.1007/s10393-014-0914-2

Abstract

For decades, southern China has been considered to be an important source for emerging influenza viruses since key hosts live together in high densities in areas with intensive agriculture. However, the underlying conditions of emergence and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) have not been studied in detail, particularly the complex spatiotemporal interplay of viral transmission between wild and domestic ducks, two major actors of AIV epidemiology. In this synthesis, we examine the risks of avian influenza spread in Poyang Lake, an area of intensive free-ranging duck production and large numbers of wild waterfowl. Our synthesis shows that farming of free-grazing domestic ducks is intensive in this area and synchronized with wild duck migration. The presence of juvenile domestic ducks in harvested paddy fields prior to the arrival and departure of migrant ducks in the same fields may amplify the risk of AIV circulation and facilitate the transmission between wild and domestic populations. We provide evidence associating wild ducks migration with the spread of H5N1 in the spring of 2008 from southern China to South Korea, Russia, and Japan, supported by documented wild duck movements and phylogenetic analyses of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 sequences. We suggest that prevention measures based on a modification of agricultural practices may be implemented in these areas to reduce the intensity of AIV transmission between wild and domestic ducks. This would require involving all local stakeholders to discuss feasible and acceptable solutions.

Keywords

avian influenza viruswild birdsmigrationinterfacecontactecologyepidemiologyChinaPoyangtelemetryremote sensingGPS

Supplementary material

10393_2014_914_MOESM1_ESM.docx (3 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 3066 kb)

Copyright information

© International Association for Ecology and Health (outside the USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julien Cappelle
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Delong Zhao
    • 2
  • Marius Gilbert
    • 4
    • 5
  • Martha I. Nelson
    • 6
  • Scott H. Newman
    • 7
  • John Y. Takekawa
    • 8
  • Nicolas Gaidet
    • 1
  • Diann J. Prosser
    • 9
  • Ying Liu
    • 10
  • Peng Li
    • 10
    • 11
  • Yuelong Shu
    • 12
  • Xiangming Xiao
    • 2
  1. 1.CIRAD-ES, UR AGIRsMontpellier cedex 5France
  2. 2.Department of Botany and Microbiology, Center for Spatial AnalysisUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA
  3. 3.Epidemiology and Public Health UnitInstitut Pasteur du CambodgePhnom PenhCambodia
  4. 4.Biological Control and Spatial EcologyUniversité Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium
  5. 5.Fonds National de la Recherche ScientifiquesBrusselsBelgium
  6. 6.Division of International Epidemiology and Population StudiesFogarty International Center, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  7. 7.Emergency Center for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) Programme - Vietnam Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)HanoiVietnam
  8. 8.U.S. Geological Survey, Western Ecological Research CenterSan Francisco Bay Estuary Field StationVallejoUSA
  9. 9.U.S. Geological SurveyPatuxent Wildlife Research CenterBeltsvilleUSA
  10. 10.School of Geography and EnvironmentJiangxi Normal UniversityNanchangChina
  11. 11.Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources ResearchChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  12. 12.National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China CDCBeijingChina