EcoHealth

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 116–120

High Prevalence of the Amphibian Chytrid Pathogen in Gabon

  • Rayna C. Bell
  • Adriana V. Gata Garcia
  • Bryan L. Stuart
  • Kelly R. Zamudio
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s10393-010-0364-4

Cite this article as:
Bell, R.C., Gata Garcia, A.V., Stuart, B.L. et al. EcoHealth (2011) 8: 116. doi:10.1007/s10393-010-0364-4

Abstract

Amphibian chytridiomycosis is an infectious disease caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) that is implicated in the worldwide decline and extinction of amphibians. Africa has been proposed as a potential source for the global expansion of Bd, yet the distribution of Bd across the continent remains largely unexplored. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we screened for the presence of Bd in 166 adult anurans from two national parks in Gabon (Monts de Cristal and Ivindo). Bd was detected in 20 of the 42 species and was present at all three sites surveyed (two in Monts de Cristal, and one in Ivindo) with high prevalence (19.6%–36.0%). Both national parks were Bd-positive at all elevations and across habitat types, though no dead or dying frogs were encountered. To our knowledge, this study presents the first evidence of Bd in Gabon and the first record of infection for 19 of the 20 species that were Bd-positive. Documenting the distribution and virulence of Bd across Africa will be essential for understanding the dynamics of amphibian chytridiomycosis across the globe.

Keywords

amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis chytridiomycosis Gabon 

Supplementary material

10393_2010_364_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (64 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 63 kb)

Copyright information

© International Association for Ecology and Health 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rayna C. Bell
    • 1
  • Adriana V. Gata Garcia
    • 1
  • Bryan L. Stuart
    • 2
  • Kelly R. Zamudio
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.North Carolina Museum of Natural SciencesRaleighUSA

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