EcoHealth

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 358–372

The Link Between Rapid Enigmatic Amphibian Decline and the Globally Emerging Chytrid Fungus

  • Stefan Lötters
  • Jos Kielgast
  • Jon Bielby
  • Sebastian Schmidtlein
  • Jaime Bosch
  • Michael Veith
  • Susan F. Walker
  • Matthew C. Fisher
  • Dennis Rödder
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s10393-010-0281-6

Cite this article as:
Lötters, S., Kielgast, J., Bielby, J. et al. EcoHealth (2009) 6: 358. doi:10.1007/s10393-010-0281-6

Abstract

Amphibians are globally declining and approximately one-third of all species are threatened with extinction. Some of the most severe declines have occurred suddenly and for unknown reasons in apparently pristine habitats. It has been hypothesized that these “rapid enigmatic declines” are the result of a panzootic of the disease chytridiomycosis caused by globally emerging amphibian chytrid fungus. In a Species Distribution Model, we identified the potential distribution of this pathogen. Areas and species from which rapid enigmatic decline are known significantly overlap with those of highest environmental suitability to the chytrid fungus. We confirm the plausibility of a link between rapid enigmatic decline in worldwide amphibian species and epizootic chytridiomycosis.

Keywords

Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis bioclimate chytridiomycosis IUCN Red List MaxEnt species distribution model 

Copyright information

© International Association for Ecology and Health 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Lötters
    • 1
  • Jos Kielgast
    • 2
  • Jon Bielby
    • 3
  • Sebastian Schmidtlein
    • 4
  • Jaime Bosch
    • 5
  • Michael Veith
    • 1
  • Susan F. Walker
    • 6
  • Matthew C. Fisher
    • 6
  • Dennis Rödder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiogeographyTrier UniversityTrierGermany
  2. 2.Department of Biology, Section for Microbiology and EvolutionCopenhagen UniversityCopenhagenDenmark
  3. 3.Department of BiologyImperial College LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of GeographyBonn UniversityBonnGermany
  5. 5.Museo Nacional de Ciencias NaturalesMadridSpain
  6. 6.Department of Infectious Disease EpidemiologyImperial College London, St. Mary’s HospitalLondonUK

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