Journal of Public Health

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 23–30

Resource use and costs in systolic heart failure according to disease severity: a pooled analysis from the German Competence Network Heart Failure

  • Janine Biermann
  • Till Neumann
  • Christiane E. Angermann
  • Hans-Dirk Düngen
  • Raimund Erbel
  • Wolfgang Herzog
  • Bernhard Maisch
  • Thomas Müller-Tasch
  • Cemil Özcelik
  • Sabine Pankuweit
  • Burkert Pieske
  • David Pittrow
  • Vera Regitz-Zagrosek
  • Thomas Scheffold
  • Stefan Störk
  • Rolf Wachter
  • Götz Gelbrich
  • Jürgen Wasem
  • Anja Neumann
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10389-011-0452-0

Cite this article as:
Biermann, J., Neumann, T., Angermann, C.E. et al. J Public Health (2012) 20: 23. doi:10.1007/s10389-011-0452-0

Abstract

Aim

Systolic chronic heart failure (CHF) is currently one of the most prevalent cardiac diseases. The present analysis sought to estimate the 1-year disease-related resource use and associated management costs of patients with CHF.

Subject and methods

A total of 2,710 individuals with systolic CHF [mean age 62.9 years ± 13.6, 25.2% female, New York Heart Association (NYHA) I–IV] were included from the German Competence Network Heart Failure. Disease-related resource use was assessed with regard to outpatient contacts with physicians, hospitalizations including rehabilitation stays and drug utilization.

Results

During 1 year, patients had on average 6.1 contacts with their general practitioner, 1.7 contacts with cardiologists and 0.8 hospital stays per year. Overall disease-related health care costs per patient were calculated at 3,150 € per year. The largest component related to hospitalizations (2,328 €, 74%), while costs of rehabilitation (294 €, 9%), medication (290 €, 9%) and outpatient contacts (238 €, 8%) were considerably lower. Compared with 2,474 € in NYHA class I, there was a cost increase in NYHA II, III and IV of 14, 48 and 71%, respectively. About 76% of this cost increase resulted from augmented hospital (inpatient) resource use.

Conclusion

The present analysis demonstrates a high disease-related resource consumption of heart failure care. In particular, patients in higher NYHA classes require increased inpatient resources. Hence, improved treatment strategies need to be developed to optimize care thus reducing hospitalization rates.

Keywords

Economic evaluation Heart failure Resource use Costs 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janine Biermann
    • 1
    • 2
  • Till Neumann
    • 1
  • Christiane E. Angermann
    • 3
  • Hans-Dirk Düngen
    • 4
  • Raimund Erbel
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Herzog
    • 5
  • Bernhard Maisch
    • 6
  • Thomas Müller-Tasch
    • 5
  • Cemil Özcelik
    • 4
  • Sabine Pankuweit
    • 6
  • Burkert Pieske
    • 7
  • David Pittrow
    • 8
  • Vera Regitz-Zagrosek
    • 9
  • Thomas Scheffold
    • 10
  • Stefan Störk
    • 3
  • Rolf Wachter
    • 11
  • Götz Gelbrich
    • 12
  • Jürgen Wasem
    • 2
  • Anja Neumann
    • 2
  1. 1.Clinic of CardiologyUniversity Hospital EssenEssenGermany
  2. 2.Institute for Health Care Management and ResearchUniversity of Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany
  3. 3.Department of Internal Medicine I and Comprehensive Heart Failure CenterUniversity Hospital WürzburgWürzburgGermany
  4. 4.Department CardiologyCharité University Medicine, Campus Virchow KlinikumBerlinGermany
  5. 5.Department of General Internal Medicine and PsychosomaticsUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  6. 6.Department of Internal Medicine – CardiologyUniversity Hospital Giessen and MarburgMarburgGermany
  7. 7.Department of CardiologyUniversity GrazGrazAustria
  8. 8.Department for Clinical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Karl Gustav CarusTechnical University of DresdenDresdenGermany
  9. 9.Department of Cardiovascular Diseases in WomenCharité University MedicineBerlinGermany
  10. 10.Institute for Heart and Circulation ResearchUniversity of Witten/HerdeckeDortmundGermany
  11. 11.Department of Cardiology and PneumologyGeorg-August University GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  12. 12.Clinical Trial Centre LeipzigUniversity of LeipzigLeipzigGermany

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