European Journal of Forest Research

, Volume 125, Issue 1, pp 1–14

Soluble N compound profiles and concentrations in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) are influenced by local climate and thinning

  • Michael Nahm
  • Thomas Holst
  • Andreas Matzarakis
  • Helmut Mayer
  • Heinz Rennenberg
  • Arthur Geßler
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10342-005-0103-5

Cite this article as:
Nahm, M., Holst, T., Matzarakis, A. et al. Eur J Forest Res (2006) 125: 1. doi:10.1007/s10342-005-0103-5

Abstract

We assessed seasonal changes of total soluble nonprotein nitrogen compounds (TSNN) in adult European beech trees (Fagus sylvatica, L.) growing under different local climate during the growing season immediately following a thinning treatment and 3 years later. In both years, samples of leaves, xylem sap and phloem exudates from beech trees growing in thinned and unthinned (control) stands on a dry, warm SW exposed and a cooler, moist NE exposed site were collected in May, July and September. In May of both years, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln) were most abundant in leaves and xylem, respectively, whereas arginine (Arg) dominated in the phloem. In July, TSNN concentrations decreased in all tissues and sites, but differences in water availability between aspects were reflected in TSNN concentrations. In September, differences in the increase of Arg concentration in the phloem were related to differences in the onset of senescence between treatments. Thinning treatment increased amino compound concentrations of beech tissues in July on both aspects, particularly at the NE thinned site. It is supposed that, the N balance of adult beech is favoured by both, the thinning treatments as well as the cool-moist climate prevailing at the NE aspect.

Keywords

Amino compounds Sap flow density N flow in the xylem Adult European beech Thinning Climate N remobilisation 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Nahm
    • 1
  • Thomas Holst
    • 2
  • Andreas Matzarakis
    • 2
  • Helmut Mayer
    • 2
  • Heinz Rennenberg
    • 1
  • Arthur Geßler
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Chair of Tree Physiology, Institute of Forest Botany and Tree PhysiologyAlbert Ludwigs University of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.Meteorological InstituteAlbert Ludwigs University of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  3. 3.School of Forest and Ecosystem ScienceUniversity of MelbourneCreswickAustralia