Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 161–170

Water exchange-minimizing DCE-MRI protocol to detect changes in tumor vascular parameters: effect of bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination therapy

Research article

DOI: 10.1007/s10334-013-0389-0

Cite this article as:
Zhu, W., Kato, Y. & Artemov, D. Magn Reson Mater Phy (2014) 27: 161. doi:10.1007/s10334-013-0389-0

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of this study was to assess changes in the tumor microvasculature induced by combination antiangiogenic therapy in MCF-7 breast tumor mouse models, using a noninvasive DCE-MRI method that minimizes the effect of water exchange.

Materials and methods

3D quantitative DCE-MRI images were acquired with a heavily T1-weighted saturation recovery gradient echo sequence with a recovery delay of 20 ms. Tumor vascular volume (VV) and vascular permeability-surface area product (PS) were obtained through a linear regression of the albumin-Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic image intensity on MCF-7 breast tumor mouse models treated with combination bevacizumab/paclitaxel therapy.

Results

Measured tumor VV values were significantly higher than the values that have been reported previously using quantitative T1 mapping, and are in good agreement with micro-CT (computed tomography) results reported earlier from other tumor models. A trend of decreasing tumor PS was detected in the group of MCF-7 tumor bearing mice treated with the bevacizumab/paclitaxel combination regimen.

Conclusion

VV and PS maps obtained by a heavily T1-weighted acquisition protocol revealed the large peripheral blood vessels as well as the permeable areas within the tumor. A 12-day/three-dose combination treatment of bevacizumab and paclitaxel resulted in delayed tumor growth and a trend of decreasing tumor vascular permeability surface area product.

Keywords

DCE-MRIWater exchangeTumor vascular volume and vascular permeabilityCombination antiangiogenic therapy

Copyright information

© ESMRMB 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Cancer Imaging Research, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological ScienceJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA