GPS Solutions

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 144–155

Single frequency processing of Ørsted GPS radio occultation measurements

  • Georg Bergeton Larsen
  • Stig Syndergaard
  • Per Høeg
  • Martin Bjært Sørensen
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10291-005-0142-x

Cite this article as:
Larsen, G.B., Syndergaard, S., Høeg, P. et al. GPS Solut (2005) 9: 144. doi:10.1007/s10291-005-0142-x

Abstract

The Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation measurements obtained using the TurboRogue GPS receiver on the Danish satellite Ørsted have been processed using the single frequency method. Atmospheric profiles of refractivity and temperature are derived and validated against numerical weather prediction data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). Results from the Ørsted GPS measurement campaign in February 2000 indicate that the single frequency method can provide retrievals with accuracy comparable to that of using two frequencies. From comparisons between measured dry temperature profiles and corresponding dry temperature profiles derived from ECMWF analysis fields, we find a mean difference of less than 0.5 K and a standard deviation of 2–4 K between 500 and 30 hPa in height. Above 30 hPa the impact of the ionosphere becomes more dominant and more difficult to eliminate using the single frequency method, and the results show degraded accuracy when compared to previous analysis results of occultation data from other missions using the dual frequency method. At latitudes less than 40° (denoted low latitudes), the standard deviation is generally smaller than at latitudes higher than 40° (denoted high latitudes). A small temperature bias is observed centered at 200 hPa for low latitudes and at 300 hPa for high latitudes. This indicates that the ECMWF analyses do not adequately resolve the tropopause temperature minimum. In the lowest part of the troposphere an observed warm bias is thought to be due to erroneous tracking of the GPS signal in cases of atmospheric multipath propagation.

Keywords

GPS Radio occultation Remote sensing Atmosphere 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georg Bergeton Larsen
    • 1
  • Stig Syndergaard
    • 2
    • 4
  • Per Høeg
    • 3
  • Martin Bjært Sørensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Danish Meteorological InstituteCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsThe University of ArizonaTucson
  3. 3.Aalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark
  4. 4.COSMIC Project OfficeUniversity Corporation for Atmospheric ResearchBoulder

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