Universal Access in the Information Society

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 91–98

Accessibility in the built and transport environment The wheelchair user perspective

Authors

  • S. Edwards
    • Transport Operations Research Group, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK E-mail: simon.edwards@newcastle.ac.uk, p.t.blythe@newcastle.ac.uk
  • S. Walsh
    • City IT Services, Newcastle City Council, UK E-mail: siobhan.walsh@newcastle.gov.uk
  • P. Blythe
    • Transport Operations Research Group, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK E-mail: simon.edwards@newcastle.ac.uk, p.t.blythe@newcastle.ac.uk
  • N. Hamilton
    • Department of Child Health, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK E-mail: neil.hamilton@newcastle.ac.uk, jennifer.souter@newcastle.ac.uk
  • J. Soutter
    • Department of Child Health, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK E-mail: neil.hamilton@newcastle.ac.uk, jennifer.souter@newcastle.ac.uk
Long paper

DOI: 10.1007/s102090100013

Cite this article as:
Edwards, S., Walsh, S., Blythe, P. et al. UAIS (2001) 1: 91. doi:10.1007/s102090100013

Abstract

‘Improving Accessidility for those with Impaired Mobility’ (I-AIM) is developing a telematic-based device to attach to wheelchairs to provide a navigation aid in the built environment. A technical project such as this must have end-user input from the beginning. In partial fulfilment of this, a user requirements survey was carried out. The survey found that accessibility in the built environment is generally possible for wheelchair users with assistance, which does not fulfil objectives of independence. Accessibility to public transport is regarded as poor. Information communication technologies can offer greater independence and inclusion, but attention must be paid to ergonomics.

Key words: Accessibility – Wheelchairs – Built environment – Transport environment – Information technology
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001