The European Journal of Health Economics

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 185–195

Economic evaluation of URMEL-ICE, a school-based overweight prevention programme comprising metabolism, exercise and lifestyle intervention in children

Authors

    • Division of Sports and Rehabilitation, Department of Internal Medicine IIUlm University Medical Centre
  • Anja Schreiber
    • Division of Sports and Rehabilitation, Department of Internal Medicine IIUlm University Medical Centre
  • Tamara Wirt
    • Division of Sports and Rehabilitation, Department of Internal Medicine IIUlm University Medical Centre
  • Martina Wiedom
    • Institute of Epidemiology and Medical BiometryUlm University
  • Jens Dreyhaupt
    • Institute of Epidemiology and Medical BiometryUlm University
  • Susanne Brandstetter
    • Division of Sports and Rehabilitation, Department of Internal Medicine IIUlm University Medical Centre
    • Medical Sociology, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive MedicineRegensburg University
  • Benjamin Koch
    • Division of Sports and Rehabilitation, Department of Internal Medicine IIUlm University Medical Centre
  • Olivia Wartha
    • Division of Sports and Rehabilitation, Department of Internal Medicine IIUlm University Medical Centre
    • Transfer Centre for Neuroscience and Learning (ZNL)University of Ulm
  • Rainer Muche
    • Institute of Epidemiology and Medical BiometryUlm University
  • Martin Wabitsch
    • Division of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of PaediatricsUlm University Medical Centre
  • Reinhold Kilian
    • Research - Mental Health Services RU, Department of Psychiatry IIUlm University
  • Jürgen M. Steinacker
    • Division of Sports and Rehabilitation, Department of Internal Medicine IIUlm University Medical Centre
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10198-011-0358-3

Cite this article as:
Kesztyüs, D., Schreiber, A., Wirt, T. et al. Eur J Health Econ (2013) 14: 185. doi:10.1007/s10198-011-0358-3

Abstract

Objective

Measuring the impact of the URMEL-ICE school-based overweight prevention programme on anthropometric measures in primary-school children, computing incremental cost-effectiveness relation (ICER) and net monetary benefit (NMB).

Methods

This is an intervention study with historical control. Propensity score method is applied to account for group differences. One-year teacher-driven classroom implementation is used, which is based on especially developed teaching material including health education, physical activity breaks and parent involvement. 354 children in the control and 365 children in the intervention group at baseline and follow-up were analysed. Effectiveness is measured as cm waist circumference (WC) and unit (0.01) waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) increase prevented in intervention vs. control group using an adjusted two-level model. Standard cost-effectiveness analysis methods, net benefit regression and a societal perspective for a 1-year time horizon are applied.

Results

WC gain was 1.61 cm and WHtR gain was 0.014 significantly less in intervention vs. control group. Intervention costs were €24.09 per child. ICER was €11.11 (95% confidence interval (CI) [8.78; 15.02]) per cm WC and €18.55 (95% CI [14.04; 26.86]) per unit WHtR gain prevented. At a maximum willingness to pay (MWTP) of €35, both values of the CIs for NMB regarding WC and WHtR are located in the positive range.

Conclusions

The study gives new information about the cost-effectiveness of structured health promotion embedded in daily routine at primary schools. Assuming a MWTP of €35 the intervention is cost-effective with a positive NMB. This result may help decision makers in implementing programmes to prevent childhood overweight in school settings.

Keywords

OverweightPrevention and controlChildCost-effectiveness

JEL Classification

I10I12I18

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011