Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 45–51

Linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from 2006 through 2008 at six hospitals in Japan

  • Yurika Ikeda-Dantsuji
  • Hideaki Hanaki
  • Fuminori Sakai
  • Kazunori Tomono
  • Yoshio Takesue
  • Junichi Honda
  • Yuriko Nonomiya
  • Akira Suwabe
  • Osanori Nagura
  • Katsunori Yanagihara
  • Hiroshige Mikamo
  • Kunihiko Fukuchi
  • Mitsuo Kaku
  • Shigeru Kohno
  • Chie Yanagisawa
  • Taiji Nakae
  • Koichiro Yoshida
  • Yoshihito Niki
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10156-010-0085-1

Cite this article as:
Ikeda-Dantsuji, Y., Hanaki, H., Sakai, F. et al. J Infect Chemother (2011) 17: 45. doi:10.1007/s10156-010-0085-1
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Abstract

Limited use of linezolid for treating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection was approved in Japan in 2006. We report here the status of linezolid-resistant MRSAs in Japan. Eleven linezolid-resistant clinical isolates from 11 patients at six hospitals were collected from 2006 through 2008. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of linezolid in these strains varied from 8 to 64 μg/ml. All strains had at least one G2576T mutation in the chromosomal gene(s) encoding domain V of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Chromosomal DNA encoding five copies of the domain V region was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Strains with the linezolid MICs of 64, 32, 16, and 8 μg/ml had the G2576T mutation(s) in four, three (or four), two, and one copy of the 23S rRNA genes, respectively. These results suggest that the level of linezolid resistance seems to be roughly correlated with the number of mutations in the genes encoding 23S rRNA. DNA samples from all 11 strains were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and were classified into seven independent clones having >92% identity. Among the 11 patients, five had been treated with linezolid and the remainder, in two hospitals, had no history of prior linezolid use. The results suggested possible nosocomial infections by linezolid-resistant MRSA.

Keywords

LinezolidResistancerRNA geneMRSANosocomial infection

Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yurika Ikeda-Dantsuji
    • 1
  • Hideaki Hanaki
    • 1
  • Fuminori Sakai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kazunori Tomono
    • 3
  • Yoshio Takesue
    • 4
  • Junichi Honda
    • 5
  • Yuriko Nonomiya
    • 6
  • Akira Suwabe
    • 6
  • Osanori Nagura
    • 7
  • Katsunori Yanagihara
    • 8
  • Hiroshige Mikamo
    • 9
  • Kunihiko Fukuchi
    • 10
  • Mitsuo Kaku
    • 11
  • Shigeru Kohno
    • 12
  • Chie Yanagisawa
    • 1
  • Taiji Nakae
    • 1
  • Koichiro Yoshida
    • 13
  • Yoshihito Niki
    • 13
  1. 1.Research Center for Anti-infectious Drugs, Kitasato Institute for Life SciencesKitasato UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Infection Control SciencesKitasato UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Infectious DiseaseOsaka University School of MedicineSuitaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Infection Control and PreventionHyogo College of MedicineNishinomiyaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Infection ControlSt. Mary’s HospitalKurumeJapan
  6. 6.Central Clinical LaboratoryIwate Medical University HospitalMoriokaJapan
  7. 7.Department of Laboratory MedicineHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsuJapan
  8. 8.Department of Laboratory MedicineNagasaki University School of MedicineNagasakiJapan
  9. 9.Department of Infection Control and PreventionAichi Medical UniversityAichiJapan
  10. 10.Department of Laboratory MedicineShowa University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  11. 11.Department of Infection Control and Laboratory Diagnostics, Internal MedicineTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineSendaiJapan
  12. 12.The Second Department of Internal MedicineNagasaki University School of MedicineNagasakiJapan
  13. 13.Department of Clinical Infectious DiseaseShowa University School of MedicineTokyoJapan