International Journal of Clinical Oncology

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 133–140

Inhibitory effects of dietary glucosylceramides on squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in NOD/SCID mice

Authors

    • Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of MedicineTottori University
  • Kazuyuki Kitatani
    • Division of Clinical Laboratory Medicine and Hematology/Oncology, Faculty of MedicineTottori University
  • Kei Fukushima
    • Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of MedicineTottori University
  • Hiroaki Yazama
    • Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of MedicineTottori University
  • Hisanori Umehara
    • Department of Hematology and ImmunologyKanazawa Medical University
  • Mitsunori Kikuchi
    • Product Design and Development SectionOryza Oil & Fat Chemical Co., Ltd.
  • Yasuyuki Igarashi
    • Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Faculty of Advanced Life SciencesHokkaido University
  • Hiroya Kitano
    • Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of MedicineTottori University
    • Division of Clinical Laboratory Medicine and Hematology/Oncology, Faculty of MedicineTottori University
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10147-010-0141-y

Cite this article as:
Fujiwara, K., Kitatani, K., Fukushima, K. et al. Int J Clin Oncol (2011) 16: 133. doi:10.1007/s10147-010-0141-y

Abstract

Background

Sphingolipids, components of cellular membranes in eukaryotic cells, have roles in the regulation of tumor growth, inflammation, angiogenesis, and immunity. We investigated the effects of dietary glucosylceramides, sphingolipids isolated from rice bran, on tumor growth of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

Methods

The tumor cell line SCCKN cells isolated from well-differentiated human head and neck cancer were subcutaneously inoculated into the right flank of NOD/SCID mice, to establish an SCCKN xenograft model. Rice bran glucosylceramides (300 mg/kg/day) were administered orally to the mice for 14 consecutive days.

Results

Dietary glucosylceramides significantly inhibited the growth of the xenograft tumor in comparison with the control group. The TUNEL stain revealed that treatment of mice with glucosylceramides increased the number of apoptotic cells in the implanted tumor tissues and that apoptosis induction was accompanied by the formation of active/cleaved caspase-3.

Conclusion

These results suggest that dietary glucosylceramides possibly exert anti-tumor activity by inducing apoptosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, their potential usefulness in treatment and prevention of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma warrants further investigation.

Keywords

CeramideHead and neck cancerSquamous cell carcinomaDietary glucosylceramideRice branApoptosis

Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2010