Neurosurgical Review

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 16–21

Some speculation on the origin of glioblastoma

  • Matthew R. Quigley
  • Christopher Post
  • Garth Ehrlich
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s10143-006-0048-2

Cite this article as:
Quigley, M.R., Post, C. & Ehrlich, G. Neurosurg Rev (2007) 30: 16. doi:10.1007/s10143-006-0048-2

Abstract

Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, is also the most deadly, with median survival of about one year, which is little improved over the last five decades. Its pathogenesis is a vexing problem. Despite extensive basic and clinical scientific research, little is known regarding the cause of this disease, the genetic factors which drive its course, or any strategies which may result in effective treatment. This persistent resistance to understanding suggests to the authors that some of the fundamental assumptions regarding the disease are likely to be flawed, and that a new paradigm must be sought to replace them. This manuscript is a review of some of what is known regarding this disease, and then presents a series of hypotheses which compromise an alternative view of glioblastoma.

Keywords

GlioblastomaBrain tumorGeneticsFamilial cancers

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew R. Quigley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher Post
    • 1
  • Garth Ehrlich
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neuro-Oncology, Department of Neurosurgery and Center for Genomic ScienceAllegheny General HospitalPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.PittsburghUSA