Lasers in Medical Science

, Volume 24, Issue 5, pp 689–695

Morphometric and histological analysis of low-power laser influence on bone morphogenetic protein in bone defects repair

Authors

  • Amanda Silveira Denadai
    • Postgraduate Program on Health and Development in West Central RegionFederal University of Mato Grosso do Sul
    • Postgraduate Program on Health and Development in West Central RegionFederal University of Mato Grosso do Sul
    • Department of PhysiotherapyUniversity for the Development of the State and Pantanal Region (UNIDERP)
  • Filipe Abdalla dos Reis
    • Department of PhysiotherapyUniversity for the Development of the State and Pantanal Region (UNIDERP)
  • Ana Carulina Guimarães Belchior
    • Department of PhysiotherapyUniversity for the Development of the State and Pantanal Region (UNIDERP)
  • Daniel Martins Pereira
    • Department of PhysiotherapyUniversity for the Development of the State and Pantanal Region (UNIDERP)
  • Doroty Mesquita Dourado
    • Department of PhysiotherapyUniversity for the Development of the State and Pantanal Region (UNIDERP)
  • Iandara S. Silva
    • Postgraduate Program on Health and Development in West Central RegionFederal University of Mato Grosso do Sul
    • Department of PhysiotherapyUniversity for the Development of the State and Pantanal Region (UNIDERP)
  • Luis Vicente Franco de Oliveira
    • Rehabilitation Sciences Master’s ProgramNove de Julho University (UNINOVE)
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10103-008-0595-6

Cite this article as:
Denadai, A.S., de Carvalho, P.T.C., dos Reis, F.A. et al. Lasers Med Sci (2009) 24: 689. doi:10.1007/s10103-008-0595-6

Abstract

Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are secreted signaling molecules belonging to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily. The objective of this study was to determine how gallium–aluminum–arsenium (GaAlAs) 650 nm laser influenced the action of BMPs on bone defects created in rat femurs. The sample consisted of 24 male albino Wistar rats. Group 1 was composed of rats with bone defects filled with bone-inducing substance, with the application of low-power laser. Group 2 contained rats with bone defects filled with a bone-inducing substance, without the application of low-power laser. Group 3 rats had bone defects not filled with a bone-inducing substance, with the application of low-power laser. Group 4 rats had bone defects and no treatment (control group). A bone defect was produced with drills. In groups 1 and 2 the defects were filled with a bone-inducing substance. The animals were treated with GaAlAs (50 mW) laser, energy density 4J/cm2, for 80 ss on a 1 cm2 area. Groups 2 and 4 were used as control. Bone samples were removed for histological procedures and morphometric analysis on the 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. Results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis. Rejection level for the null hypothesis was 0.05. Statistical differences were found in the comparison between group 1 (G1), G2, G3 and G4 [analysis of variance (ANOVA); P < 0.0134]. There was a statistically significant correlation between groups 1 and 4 (P < 0.01). The results of other correlations by Tukey’s post-hoc test were: group 1 vs group 3 (P = 0.341), group 1 vs group 2 (P = 0.862), group 2 vs group 4 (P = 0.061), group 2 vs group 3 (P = 0.744), and group 3 vs group 4 (P = 0.249). We concluded that the association of low-power laser with a bone-inducing substance produced better results than when low-power laser or BMPs were used alone.

Keywords

Low-power laser Bone repair Biomaterials Bone morphogenetic proteins

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd 2008