Changing etiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a nationwide multicenter study in Korea

  • S.-Y. Moon
  • D. R. Chung
  • S.-W. Kim
  • H. H. Chang
  • H. Lee
  • D. S. Jung
  • Y.-S. Kim
  • S. I. Jung
  • S. Y. Ryu
  • S. T. Heo
  • C. Moon
  • H. K. Ki
  • J. S. Son
  • K. T. Kwon
  • S. Y. Shin
  • J. S. Lee
  • S. S. Lee
  • J.-Y. Rhee
  • J.-A. Lee
  • M. K. Joung
  • H. S. Cheong
  • K. R. Peck
  • J.-H. Song
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10096-010-0929-8

Cite this article as:
Moon, SY., Chung, D.R., Kim, SW. et al. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis (2010) 29: 793. doi:10.1007/s10096-010-0929-8

Abstract

Epidemiologic data on the etiologic organisms is important for appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment of bacterial meningitis. We identified the etiologies of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in Korean adults and the associated epidemiological factors. A retrospective, multicenter nationwide study was carried out. Patients 18 years of age or older with community-acquired bacterial meningitis with a confirmed pathogen were enrolled. Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were collected. One hundred and ninety-five cases were collected. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen (50.8%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (10.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.7%), Listeria monocytogenes (6.7%), and group B Streptococcus (3.1%). The penicillin resistance rate of the S. pneumoniae was 60.3%; 40.0% of the organisms were not susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins. The combination of third-generation cephalosporin with vancomycin was used in 76.3% of cases. Steroids were given before or with the first dose of antibiotics in 37.4% of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 20.5% and neurological sequelae developed in 15.6% of cases. S. pneumoniae was the most common organism identified in community-acquired bacterial meningitis among Korean adults. S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, L. monocytogenes, and group B Streptococcus were also common. S. pneumoniae had high rates of resistance to penicillin and third-generation cephalosporins.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • S.-Y. Moon
    • 1
  • D. R. Chung
    • 1
  • S.-W. Kim
    • 2
  • H. H. Chang
    • 2
  • H. Lee
    • 3
  • D. S. Jung
    • 3
  • Y.-S. Kim
    • 4
  • S. I. Jung
    • 5
  • S. Y. Ryu
    • 6
  • S. T. Heo
    • 7
  • C. Moon
    • 8
  • H. K. Ki
    • 9
  • J. S. Son
    • 10
  • K. T. Kwon
    • 11
  • S. Y. Shin
    • 12
  • J. S. Lee
    • 13
  • S. S. Lee
    • 14
  • J.-Y. Rhee
    • 15
  • J.-A. Lee
    • 1
  • M. K. Joung
    • 1
  • H. S. Cheong
    • 1
  • K. R. Peck
    • 1
  • J.-H. Song
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases, Samsung Medical CenterSungkyunkwan University School of MedicineSeoulKorea
  2. 2.Kyungpook National University HospitalDaeguSouth Korea
  3. 3.Dong-A University HospitalBusanSouth Korea
  4. 4.Chungnam National University HospitalDaejonSouth Korea
  5. 5.Chonnam National University HospitalGwangjuSouth Korea
  6. 6.Keimyung University Dongsan Medical CenterDaeguSouth Korea
  7. 7.Gyeongsang National University HospitalJinjuSouth Korea
  8. 8.Inje University Busan Paik HospitalBusanSouth Korea
  9. 9.Konkuk University HospitalSeoulSouth Korea
  10. 10.Kyung Hee University East-West Neo Medical CenterSeoulSouth Korea
  11. 11.Daegu Fatima HospitalDaeguSouth Korea
  12. 12.Cheju National University HospitalJejuSouth Korea
  13. 13.Kangdong Sacred Heart HospitalSeoulSouth Korea
  14. 14.Hallym University Sacred Heart HospitalGyeonggi-doSouth Korea
  15. 15.Dankook University HospitalCheonanSouth Korea