Imported leishmaniasis in Germany 2001–2004: data of the SIMPID surveillance network

  • T. Weitzel
  • N. Mühlberger
  • T. Jelinek
  • M. Schunk
  • S. Ehrhardt
  • C. Bogdan
  • K. Arasteh
  • T. Schneider
  • W. V. Kern
  • G. Fätkenheuer
  • G. Boecken
  • T. Zoller
  • M. Probst
  • M. Peters
  • T. Weinke
  • S. Gfrörer
  • H. Klinker
  • M.-L. Holthoff-Stich
  • Surveillance Importierter Infektionen in Deutschland (SIMPID) Surveillance Network
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10096-005-1363-1

Cite this article as:
Weitzel, T., Mühlberger, N., Jelinek, T. et al. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis (2005) 24: 471. doi:10.1007/s10096-005-1363-1

Abstract

Leishmaniasis is a rare, non-notifiable disease in Germany. Epidemiological and clinical data, therefore, are scarce. Most infections seen in Germany are contracted outside the country. The German surveillance network for imported infectious diseases (Surveillance Importierter Infektionen in Deutschland, or SIPMID) recorded 42 cases of imported leishmaniasis (16 visceral, 23 cutaneous, and 3 mucocutaneous) from January 2001 to June 2004. Although most infections were acquired in European Mediterranean countries, the risk of infection was highest for travelers to Latin America. HIV coinfection was observed significantly more often in patients with visceral leishmaniasis than in patients with cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (31 vs. 4%, p=0.02). The median time to a definitive diagnosis was 85 days in cases of visceral leishmaniasis and 61 days in cases of cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, reflecting the unfamiliarity of German physicians with leishmanial infections. Visceral leishmaniasis was treated most frequently with amphotericin B, whereas cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis was treated with a variety of local and systemic therapies. The findings presented here should serve to increase awareness as well as improve clinical management of leishmaniasis in Germany.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Weitzel
    • 1
  • N. Mühlberger
    • 1
  • T. Jelinek
    • 1
  • M. Schunk
    • 2
  • S. Ehrhardt
    • 3
  • C. Bogdan
    • 4
  • K. Arasteh
    • 5
  • T. Schneider
    • 6
  • W. V. Kern
    • 7
  • G. Fätkenheuer
    • 8
  • G. Boecken
    • 9
  • T. Zoller
    • 10
  • M. Probst
    • 10
  • M. Peters
    • 11
  • T. Weinke
    • 12
  • S. Gfrörer
    • 13
  • H. Klinker
    • 14
  • M.-L. Holthoff-Stich
    • 15
  • Surveillance Importierter Infektionen in Deutschland (SIMPID) Surveillance Network
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für TropenmedizinBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Abteilung für Infektions- und TropenmedizinUniversität MünchenMunichGermany
  3. 3.Bernhard-Nocht-Institut für TropenmedizinHamburgGermany
  4. 4.Abteilung Medizinische Mikrobiologie und HygieneUniversitätsklinikum FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  5. 5.Klinik für Innere Medizin, Infektiologie/GastroenterologieVivantes Auguste-Viktoria-KlinikumBerlinGermany
  6. 6.Medizinische Klinik I (Gastroenterologie, Infektiologie, und Rheumatologie)Charité, Universitätsmedizin BerlinBerlinGermany
  7. 7.Abteilung Innere Medizin II, InfektiologieUniversitätsklinikum FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  8. 8.Klinik I für Innere Medizin, InfektiologieUniversität KölnCologneGermany
  9. 9.Fachgebiet für Angewandte Tropenmedizin und InfektionsepidemiologieSchifffahrtsmedizinisches InstitutKronshagenGermany
  10. 10.Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt InfektiologieUniversitätsklinikum CharitéBerlinGermany
  11. 11.Praxis für TropenmedizinHamburgGermany
  12. 12.Medizinische Klinik, Abteilung Gastroenterologie/InfektiologieKlinikum Ernst von BergmannPotsdamGermany
  13. 13.Institut für LaboratoriumsmedizinMarienhospitalStuttgartGermany
  14. 14.Schwerpunkt Hepatologie/InfektiologieMedizinische Poliklinik der Universität, Universitätsklinikum WürzburgWürzburgGermany
  15. 15.Tropenmedizinische AbteilungMissionsärztliche KlinikWürzburgGermany

Personalised recommendations