Journal of Wood Science

, Volume 53, Issue 6, pp 487–493

Chemical analysis of the product in acid-catalyzed solvolysis of cellulose using polyethylene glycol and ethylene carbonate

Authors

    • Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute (FFPRI)
  • Masako Aratani
    • Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciencesthe University of Tokyo
  • Satoshi Kubo
    • Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute (FFPRI)
  • Hirokuni Ono
    • Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciencesthe University of Tokyo
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10086-007-0886-8

Cite this article as:
Yamada, T., Aratani, M., Kubo, S. et al. J Wood Sci (2007) 53: 487. doi:10.1007/s10086-007-0886-8

Abstract

Degradation and decomposition of cellulose were studied in an acid-catalyzed solvolysis treatment of biomass using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and ethylene carbonate (EC). The solvolysis reaction was followed by a typical reaction system of wood liquefaction that uses sulfuric acid catalyst at 140° or 150°C at atmospheric pressure. The methods of fractionation and chemical analysis of the degraded cellulose in the solvolyzed product are discussed. The solvolyzed product was separated into several fractions, and they were hydrolyzed to release glucose and levulinic acid to determine the quantity of glucosides and levulinates in the solvolysis product. The data clearly showed that the solvolysis reaction had the same mechanism when using PEG or EC. Degradation of cellulose leads to the formation of glucosides, which then decompose, resulting in a levulinic acid structure, and producing a water-insoluble fraction. The conversion rates of both glucosides and levulinates strongly depend on the reaction conditions of the solvolysis. In particular, EC promotes faster conversion of the reactions. The method discussed here is a chemical analytical technique for characterization of the products of wood liquefaction.

Key words

Cellulose Ethylene carbonate Polyethylene glycol Solvolysis Wood liquefaction

Copyright information

© The Japan Wood Research Society 2007