Animal Cognition

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 137–146

Dynamic object perception by pigeons: discrimination of action in video presentations

  • Robert G. Cook
  • Robert Shaw
  • Aaron P. Blaisdell
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s100710100097

Cite this article as:
Cook, R.G., Shaw, R. & Blaisdell, A.P. Anim.Cogn. (2001) 4: 137. doi:10.1007/s100710100097

Abstract

Two experiments examined the discrimination by pigeons of relative motion using computer-generated video stimuli. Using a go/no-go procedure, pigeons were tested with video stimuli in which the camera’s perspective went either "around" or "through" an approaching object in a semi-realistic context. Experiment 1 found that pigeons could learn this discrimination and transfer it to videos composed from novel objects. Experiment 2 found that the order of the video’s frames was critical to the discrimination of the videos. We hypothesize that the pigeons perceived a three-dimensional representation of the objects and the camera’s relative motion and used this as the primary basis for discrimination. It is proposed that the pigeons might be able to form generalized natural categories for the different kinds of motions portrayed in the videos.

Object perception Motion perception Visual cognition Discrimination learning Pigeons

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert G. Cook
    • 1
  • Robert Shaw
    • 1
  • Aaron P. Blaisdell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, 530 Boston Ave, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155USA