Animal Cognition

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 67–76

Effects of tilted orientations and face-like configurations on visual search asymmetry in macaques

Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10071-013-0638-7

Cite this article as:
Nakata, R., Eifuku, S. & Tamura, R. Anim Cogn (2014) 17: 67. doi:10.1007/s10071-013-0638-7

Abstract

Visual search asymmetry has been used as an important tool for exploring cognitive mechanisms in humans. Here, we examined visual search asymmetry in two macaques toward two types of stimulus: the orientation of line stimuli and face-like stimuli. In the experiment, the monkeys were required to detect an odd target among numerous uniform distracters. The monkeys detected a tilted-lines target among horizontal- or vertical-lined distracters significantly faster than a horizontal- or vertical-lined target among tilted-lined distracters, regardless of the display size. However, unlike the situation in which inverted-face stimuli were introduced as distracters, this effect was diminished if upright-face stimuli were used as distracters. Additionally, monkeys detected an upright-face target among inverted-face distracters significantly faster than an inverted-face target among upright-face distracters, regardless of the display size. These results demonstrate that macaques can search a target efficiently to detect both tilted lines among non-tilted lines and upright faces among inverted faces. This clarifies that there are several types of visual search asymmetry in macaques.

Keywords

FaceVisual searchSearch asymmetrySearch efficiencyMacaque monkey

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Integrative Neuroscience, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of ToyamaToyamaJapan