Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 220–226

Juvenile Chronic Arthritis in Adult Life: A Study of Long-term Outcome in Patients with Juvenile Chronic Arthritis or Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis

  • R. Koivuniemi
  • M. Leirisalo-Repo
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s100670050088

Cite this article as:
Koivuniemi, R. & Leirisalo-Repo, M. Clin Rheumatol (1999) 18: 220. doi:10.1007/s100670050088

Abstract:

We compared the prognostic factors and outcome of 30 patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) extending into adult life with those of 30 patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at a university adult rheumatology clinic; pairs were matched for sex and duration of disease (mean 8 years). One-third of JCA patients had seronegative polyarticular disease and another third had oligoarticular disease. In a third of the JCA patients, the clinical presentation changed during the follow-up. Over half of the RA patients had seropositive polyarticular and a one-third had seronegative polyarticular disease. Fewer seropositive patients were recorded in the JCA group than in the RA group both at the beginning (16.7% versus 56.7%; p = 0.003) and at the end of the follow-up (14.3% versus 59.3%; p = 0.001). JCA patients developed less radiographic changes than RA patients (46.7% versus 76.7%; p = 0.034); oligoarthritis in the JCA group had the best prognosis whereas seropositive polyarthritis in the RA group had the worst prognosis. Significantly more patients with JCA than RA (60% versus 23%; p = 0.009) were in remission at the end of the follow-up. In conclusion, when studied in adult life, the long-term prognosis is better in patients with JCA than in those with RA.

Key words:Juvenile chronic arthritis – Prognosis – Rheumatoid arthritis

Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Koivuniemi
    • 1
  • M. Leirisalo-Repo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, FinlandFI