Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 31, Issue 10, pp 1505–1510

Self-reported knee instability and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis: results of the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort

  • Martin van der Esch
  • Jesper Knoop
  • Marike van der Leeden
  • Ramon Voorneman
  • Martijn Gerritsen
  • Dick Reiding
  • Suzanne Romviel
  • Dirk L. Knol
  • Willem F. Lems
  • Joost Dekker
  • Leo D. Roorda
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10067-012-2025-1

Cite this article as:
van der Esch, M., Knoop, J., van der Leeden, M. et al. Clin Rheumatol (2012) 31: 1505. doi:10.1007/s10067-012-2025-1

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate whether self-reported knee instability is associated with activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), in addition to knee pain and muscle strength. A cohort of 248 patients diagnosed with knee OA was examined. Self-reported knee instability was defined as the perception of any episode of buckling, shifting, or giving way of the knee in the past 3 months. Knee pain was assessed using a numeric rating scale, and knee extensor and flexor strength were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Activity limitations were measured by using the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function questionnaire, the timed Get Up and Go, and the timed stair climbing and three questionnaires evaluating walking, climbing stairs, and rising from a chair. Other potential determinants of activity limitations were also collected, including joint proprioception, joint laxity, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), disease duration, and radiographic disease severity. Regression analyses evaluated the effect of adding self-reported knee instability to knee pain and muscle strength, when examining associations with the activity limitations measures. Self-reported knee instability was common (65 %) in this cohort of patients with knee OA. Analyses revealed that self-reported knee instability is significantly associated with activity limitations, even after controlling for knee pain and muscle strength. Joint proprioception, joint laxity, age, sex, BMI, duration of complaints, and radiographic severity did not confound the associations. In conclusion, self-reported knee instability is associated with activity limitations in patients with knee OA, in addition to knee pain and muscle strength. Clinically, self-reported knee instability should be assessed in addition to knee pain and muscle strength.

Keywords

Activity limitations Joint instability Knee Osteoarthritis 

Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin van der Esch
    • 1
    • 6
  • Jesper Knoop
    • 1
  • Marike van der Leeden
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ramon Voorneman
    • 3
  • Martijn Gerritsen
    • 3
  • Dick Reiding
    • 3
  • Suzanne Romviel
    • 1
  • Dirk L. Knol
    • 4
  • Willem F. Lems
    • 3
    • 5
  • Joost Dekker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Leo D. Roorda
    • 1
  1. 1.Amsterdam Rehabilitation Research CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Department of Psychiatry, EMGO InstituteVU University Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Jan van Breemen Research InstituteAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO InstituteVU University Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Department of RheumatologyVU University Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  6. 6.University of Applied SciencesAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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