Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 29, Issue 11, pp 1223–1228

The synovial fluid adiponectin-leptin ratio predicts pain with knee osteoarthritis

Authors

    • Division of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity Health Network
    • Department of SurgeryUniversity of Toronto
    • Toronto Western HospitalUniversity Health Network
  • Mark Takahashi
    • MaRS Discovery InstituteUniversity of Toronto
  • Holly Smith
    • Division of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity Health Network
    • Department of SurgeryUniversity of Toronto
  • Randy Rizek
    • Division of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity Health Network
    • Department of SurgeryUniversity of Toronto
  • Nizar N. Mahomed
    • Division of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity Health Network
    • Division of Health Care and Outcomes Research and Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, Toronto Western Research Institute
    • Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and Department of SurgeryUniversity of Toronto
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10067-010-1429-z

Cite this article as:
Gandhi, R., Takahashi, M., Smith, H. et al. Clin Rheumatol (2010) 29: 1223. doi:10.1007/s10067-010-1429-z

Abstract

The relationship between adipokines, such as leptin and adiponectin, and cartilage degeneration is being increasingly recognized. We asked what the relationship is between these hormones and patient-reported knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain. We collected demographic data, Short Form McGill Pain scores, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) pain scores, and synovial fluid (SF) samples from 60 consecutive patients with severe knee OA at the time of joint replacement surgery. SF samples were analyzed for leptin and adiponectin using specific ELISA. Non-parametric correlations and linear regression modeling were used to identify the relationship between the adipokines and pain levels. The correlations between the individual adipokines and the pain scales were low to moderate and consistently less than that for the corresponding adiponectin/leptin (A/L) ratio. Linear regression modeling showed that the A/L ratio was a significant predictor of a greater level of pain on the MPQ-SF (p = 0.03) but not the WOMAC pain scale (p = 0.77). A greater A/L ratio was associated with less pain with severe knee OA and this metabolic pathway may represent a target for novel therapeutics.

Keywords

LeptinObesityOsteoarthritisPain

Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2010