Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 28, Issue 5, pp 595–598

Spatial-temporal parameters of gait in women with fibromyalgia

Authors

    • Department of Physical Education and SportsUniversity of Granada
  • Virginia A. Aparicio García-Molina
    • Department of Physical Education and SportsUniversity of Granada
  • Jesús M. Porres Foulquie
    • Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Granada
  • Manuel Delgado Fernández
    • Department of Physical Education and SportsUniversity of Granada
  • Victor M. Soto Hermoso
    • Department of Physical Education and SportsUniversity of Granada
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10067-009-1101-7

Cite this article as:
Heredia Jiménez, J.M., Aparicio García-Molina, V.A., Porres Foulquie, J.M. et al. Clin Rheumatol (2009) 28: 595. doi:10.1007/s10067-009-1101-7

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to determine if there are differences in such parameters among patients affected by fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy subjects and whether the degree of affectation by FM can decrease the gait parameters. We studied 55 women with FM and 44 controls. Gait analysis was performed using an instrumented walkway for measurement of the kinematic parameters of gait (GAITRite system), and patients completed a Spanish version of Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Significant differences (p < 0.001) between FM and control groups were found in velocity, stride length, cadence, single support ratio, double support ratio, stance phase ratio, and swing phase ratio. There were significant inverse correlations between FIQ and velocity, stride length, swing phase, and single support, whereas significant direct correlations were found with stance phase and double support. Gait parameters of women affected by FM were severely impaired when compared to those of healthy women. Different factors such as lack of physical activity, bradikinesia, overweight, fatigue, and pain together with a lower isometric force in the legs can be responsible for the alterations in gait and poorer life quality of women with FM.

Keywords

BiomechanicsFibromyalgiaGaitQuality of life

Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2009