Clinical Rheumatology

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 147–151

Systemic lupus erythematosus and acute pancreatitis: a case series

Case Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10067-003-0793-3

Cite this article as:
Derk, C.T. & DeHoratius, R.J. Clin Rheumatol (2004) 23: 147. doi:10.1007/s10067-003-0793-3

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether corticosteroid use is the etiological agent in acute pancreatitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, or whether it is related to the underlying connective tissue disorder. Hospital admissions at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital between 1982 and 2002 that carried the dual diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and pancreatitis were identified, and demographic data, clinical interventions and parameters of clinical progression of their disease were identified. From 2947 admissions with systemic lupus erythematosus 25 (0.85%) were diagnosed as having acute pancreatitis; 76% of cases had active systemic lupus erythematosus on presentation, with an average of 4.4 organ involvement, and a clustering of renal disease (56%), pleural effusion (48%) and arthritis (44%) in these patients. Fifteen patients with active disease and three whose disease was inactive received increased doses of corticosteroids, and four active cases and one inactive one stayed on the same doses. Two inactive patients received no corticosteroids before or after the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Eighty-two percent of patients had clinical and laboratory improvement on the higher or maintenance dose of corticosteroids. We therefore concluded that acute pancreatitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus, and corticosteroids do not appear to be the etiological agent.

Keywords

Abdominal painGastrointestinal manifestationsPancreatitisSystemic lupus erythematosus

Abbreviations

ARDS

Acute respiratory distress syndrome

ALT

Alanine aminotransferase

ANA

Antinuclear antibodies

BUN

Blood urea nitrogen

GGTP

γ-glutamyltransferase

LDH

Lactate dehydrogenase

MCP

Metacarpophalangeal

PIP

Proximal interphalangeal

PT

Prothrombin

PTT

Partial thromboplastin

SLE

Systemic lupus erythematosus

Copyright information

© Clinical Rheumatology 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Rheumatology, Department of MedicineThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA