Granular Matter

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 893–911

Buoyancy driven convection in vertically shaken granular matter: experiment, numerics, and theory

  • Peter Eshuis
  • Ko van der Weele
  • Meheboob Alam
  • Henk Jan van Gerner
  • Martin van der Hoef
  • Hans Kuipers
  • Stefan Luding
  • Devaraj van der Meer
  • Detlef Lohse
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10035-013-0440-x

Cite this article as:
Eshuis, P., van der Weele, K., Alam, M. et al. Granular Matter (2013) 15: 893. doi:10.1007/s10035-013-0440-x

Abstract

Buoyancy driven granular convection is studied for a shallow, vertically shaken granular bed in a quasi 2D container. Starting from the granular Leidenfrost state, in which a dense particle cluster floats on top of a dilute gaseous layer of fast particles (Meerson et al. in Phys Rev Lett 91:024301, 2003; Eshuis et al. in Phys Rev Lett 95:258001, 2005), we witness the emergence of counter-rotating convection rolls when the shaking strength is increased above a critical level. This resembles the classical onset of convection—at a critical value of the Rayleigh number—in a fluid heated from below. The same transition, even quantitatively, is seen in molecular dynamics simulations, and explained by a hydrodynamic-like model in which the granular material is treated as a continuum. The critical shaking strength for the onset of granular convection is accurately reproduced by a linear stability analysis of the model. The results from experiment, simulation, and theory are in good agreement. The present paper extends and completes our earlier analysis (Eshuis et al. in Phys Rev Lett 104:038001, 2010).

Keywords

Shaken granular matter Granular gas Leidenfrost state 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Eshuis
    • 1
  • Ko van der Weele
    • 2
  • Meheboob Alam
    • 3
  • Henk Jan van Gerner
    • 1
  • Martin van der Hoef
    • 1
  • Hans Kuipers
    • 4
  • Stefan Luding
    • 5
  • Devaraj van der Meer
    • 1
  • Detlef Lohse
    • 1
  1. 1.Physics of Fluids & MESA + Research Institute University of TwenteEnschedeThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Mathematics DepartmentUniversity of PatrasPatrasGreece
  3. 3.Engineering Mechanics UnitJawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific ResearchBangaloreIndia
  4. 4.Fundamentals of Chemical Reaction EngineeringTechnical University of EindhovenEindhovenThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Multi Scale MechanicsUniversity of TwenteEnschedeThe Netherlands

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