Medical Molecular Morphology

, Volume 45, Issue 1, pp 1–6

Application of in utero electroporation and live imaging in the analyses of neuronal migration during mouse brain development

  • Yoshiaki V. Nishimura
  • Tomoyasu Shinoda
  • Yutaka Inaguma
  • Hidenori Ito
  • Koh-ichi Nagata
Award Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00795-011-0557-0

Cite this article as:
Nishimura, Y.V., Shinoda, T., Inaguma, Y. et al. Med Mol Morphol (2012) 45: 1. doi:10.1007/s00795-011-0557-0
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Abstract

Correct neuronal migration is crucial for brain architecture and function. During cerebral cortex development (corticogenesis), excitatory neurons generated in the proliferative zone of the dorsal telencephalon (mainly ventricular zone) move through the intermediate zone and migrate past the neurons previously located in the cortical plate and come to rest just beneath the marginal zone. The in utero electroporation technique is a powerful method for rapid gain- and loss-of-function studies of neuronal development, especially neuronal migration. This method enabled us to introduce genes of interest into ventricular zone progenitor cells of mouse embryos and to observe resulting phenotypes such as proliferation, migration, and cell morphology at later stages. In this Award Lecture Review, we focus on the application of the in utero electroporation method to functional analyses of cytoskeleton-related protein septin. We then refer to, as an advanced technique, the in utero electroporation-based real-time imaging method for analyses of cell signaling regulating neuronal migration. The in utero electroporation method and its application would contribute to medical molecular morphology through identification and characterization of the signaling pathways disorganized in various neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Key words

SeptinCell signalingIn utero electroporationNeuronal migrationLive imaging

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Clinical Molecular Morphology 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshiaki V. Nishimura
    • 1
  • Tomoyasu Shinoda
    • 1
  • Yutaka Inaguma
    • 1
  • Hidenori Ito
    • 1
  • Koh-ichi Nagata
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Institute for Developmental ResearchAichi Human Service CenterKasugai, AichiJapan