Extremophiles

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 279–284

Systematic analysis of HSP gene expression and effects on cell growth and survival at high hydrostatic pressure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  • Takeshi Miura
  • Hiroaki Minegishi
  • Ron Usami
  • Fumiyoshi Abe
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00792-005-0496-6

Cite this article as:
Miura, T., Minegishi, H., Usami, R. et al. Extremophiles (2006) 10: 279. doi:10.1007/s00792-005-0496-6

Abstract

We systematically investigated the role of HSP genes in the growth and survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under high hydrostatic pressure together with analysis of pressure-regulated gene expression. Cells of strain BY4742 were capable of growth at moderate pressure of 25 MPa. When pressure of 25 MPa was applied to the cells, the expression of HSP78, HSP104, and HSP10 was upregulated by about 3- to 4-fold, and that of HSP32, HSP42, and HSP82 was upregulated by about 2- to 2.6-fold. However, the loss of one of the six genes did not markedly affect growth at 25 MPa, while the loss of HSP31 impaired high-pressure growth. These results suggest that Hsp31 plays a role in high-pressure growth but that the six upregulated genes do not. Extremely high pressure of 125 MPa decreased the viability of the wild-type cells to 1% of the control level. Notably, the loss of HSP genes other than HSP31 enhanced the survival rate by about fivefold at 125 MPa, suggesting that the cellular defensive system against high pressure could be strengthened upon the loss of the HSP genes. In this paper, we describe the requirement for and significance of a subset of HSP genes in yeast cell growth at moderate pressure and survival at extremely high pressure.

Keywords

High hydrostatic pressureHeat-shock proteinsPiezoadaptationPiezotolerancePiezophysiologySaccharomyces cerevisiae

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Miura
    • 1
  • Hiroaki Minegishi
    • 2
  • Ron Usami
    • 2
  • Fumiyoshi Abe
    • 1
  1. 1.Extremobiosphere Research CenterJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)Yokosuka 237-0061Japan
  2. 2.Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of EngineeringToyo UniversityKawagoe 350-0815Japan