Extremophiles

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 333–341

Quorum sensing in halophilic bacteria: detection of N-acyl-homoserine lactones in the exopolysaccharide-producing species of Halomonas

  • Inmaculada Llamas
  • Emilia Quesada
  • Maria José Martínez-Cánovas
  • Matthew Gronquist
  • Anatol Eberhard
  • Juan E. González
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00792-005-0448-1

Cite this article as:
Llamas, I., Quesada, E., Martínez-Cánovas, M.J. et al. Extremophiles (2005) 9: 333. doi:10.1007/s00792-005-0448-1

Abstract

Some members of the moderately halophilic genus Halomonas, such as H. eurihalina, H. maura, H. ventosae and H. anticariensis, produce exopolysaccharides with applications in many industrial fields. We report here that these four species also produce autoinducer molecules that are involved in the cell-to-cell signaling process known as quorum sensing. By using the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) indicator strains Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZRL4) and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, we discovered that all the Halomonas strains examined synthesize detectable AHL signal molecules. The synthesis of these compounds was growth-phase dependent and maximal activity was reached during the late exponential to stationary phases. One of these AHLs seems to be synthesized only in the stationary phase. Some of the AHLs produced by H. anticariens FP35T were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry as N-butanoyl homoserine lactone (C4-HL), N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (C6-HL), N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HL) and N-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (C12-HL). This study suggests that quorum sensing may also play an important role in extreme environments.

Keywords

Quorum sensing N-acyl-homoserine lactone Exopolysaccharide Halophiles Halomonas 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Inmaculada Llamas
    • 1
  • Emilia Quesada
    • 2
  • Maria José Martínez-Cánovas
    • 2
  • Matthew Gronquist
    • 3
  • Anatol Eberhard
    • 4
  • Juan E. González
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular and Cell BiologyUniversity of Texas at DallasRichardsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of GranadaSpain
  3. 3.Department of ChemistrySUNY CortlandCortlandUSA
  4. 4.Department of MicrobiologyCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

Personalised recommendations