European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

, Volume 22, Issue 7, pp 433–442

Social skills improvement in children with high-functioning autism: a pilot randomized controlled trial

  • A. Baghdadli
  • J. Brisot
  • V. Henry
  • C. Michelon
  • M. Soussana
  • C. Rattaz
  • M. C. Picot
Original Contribution

DOI: 10.1007/s00787-013-0388-8

Cite this article as:
Baghdadli, A., Brisot, J., Henry, V. et al. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry (2013) 22: 433. doi:10.1007/s00787-013-0388-8

Abstract

High-functioning autism (HFA) is characterized by persistent impairment in social interaction despite the absence of mental retardation. Although an increasing number of group-based programs for the improvement of social skills have been described, randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate their efficacy. To compare the effect of a Social Skills Training Group-based Program (SST-GP) and a Leisure Activities Group-based Program (LA-GP) on the perception of facial emotions and quality of life (QoL) in young people with HFA. Eligible patients were children and adolescents with HFA. Participants were randomized to the SST or LA group. The primary outcome was defined as an improvement of 2 points in error rates for facial emotion labeling (DANVA2) from baseline. After the 6-month training period, the SST Group made fewer errors in labeling anger on adult faces, whereas error rates in the LA Group remained stable. Progress in the ability to recognize anger in the SST Group was due to better recognition of low intensity stimuli on adult faces. QoL increased in the SST Group in the dimension of school environment, as a marker of the transfer of skills acquired in the treatment setting to their use in the community. The SST-GP had higher efficacy than the LA-GP. Data justify replication using larger samples.

Keywords

High-functioning autismSocial skills trainingFacial emotion recognitionQuality of lifeControlled trials

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Baghdadli
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Brisot
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. Henry
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Michelon
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Soussana
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Rattaz
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. C. Picot
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Autism Resources Centre, Clinique Peyre-PlantadeCHU MontpellierMontpellier, Cedex 5France
  2. 2.Research Team 4556 (Epsylon Laboratory)University MontpellierMontpellierFrance
  3. 3.CIC 1001, Unité Recherche Clinique (DIM)CHRUMontpellierFrance