European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

, Volume 14, Issue 6, pp 305–309

12-month efficacy and safety of OROS® MPH in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder switched from MPH

  • Peter Hoare
  • H. Remschmidt
  • R. Medori
  • C. Ettrich
  • A. Rothenberger
  • P. Santosh
  • M. Schmit
  • Q. Spender
  • R. Tamhne
  • M. Thompson
  • C. Tinline
  • G. E. Trott
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION

DOI: 10.1007/s00787-005-0486-3

Cite this article as:
Hoare, P., Remschmidt, H., Medori, R. et al. Europ.Child & Adolescent Psych (2005) 14: 305. doi:10.1007/s00787-005-0486-3

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term clinical treatment with OROS® methylphenidate (MPH) (Concerta®) in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who had been previously treated with immediate release (IR) MPH.

Methods

Subjects aged 6–16 years (n=105) who were stable on IR MPH (10–60 mg/day) were switched to 18, 36 or 54mg OROS® MPH once daily for 21 days, depending on prestudy MPH dose. Subjects who benefited from OROS® MPH could continue in a 12-month extension period. ADHD symptoms and treatment response were assessed by parents/caregivers and investigators.

Results

Out of 105 enrolled children, 101 completed the 21-day treatment phase. In all, 89 parents/caregivers (88.1%) wanted their child to continue with the study treatment into the extension phase, and 56 children (63 %) completed the 1-year trial. The parent/caregiver global assessment of satisfaction ranged from 49 to 69% during the extension phase, and 49 to 71% of investigators rated the treatment as adequate. Efficacy and satisfaction were found more commonly in patients in the older age group (10–16 years), those on a higher dose (36 mg or 54 mg) and with the predominantly inattentive ADHD subtype. OROS® MPH was well tolerated.

Conclusions

Children and adolescents can effectively and safely be switched from IR MPH to OROS® MPH with improved symptom control and compliance.

Key words

ADHDCONCERTA®methylphenidateOROS®long-term treatment

Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Hoare
    • 1
  • H. Remschmidt
    • 2
  • R. Medori
    • 3
  • C. Ettrich
    • 4
  • A. Rothenberger
    • 5
  • P. Santosh
    • 6
  • M. Schmit
    • 7
  • Q. Spender
    • 8
  • R. Tamhne
    • 9
  • M. Thompson
    • 10
  • C. Tinline
    • 11
  • G. E. Trott
    • 12
  1. 1.Child and Family Mental Health ServiceRoyal Hospital for Sick ChildrenEdinburgh EH9 1LLUK
  2. 2.Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie des Kindes- und JugendaltersMarburgGermany
  3. 3.Janssen-Cilag Europe, Middle-East, AfricaNeussGermany
  4. 4.Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie der Universität Leipzig, Dritte EtageLeipzigGermany
  5. 5.Kinder und Jugendpsychiatrie der Georg-August UniversitätGöttingenGermany
  6. 6.Maudsley Hospital, Institute of PsychiatryLondon SE5 8AFUK
  7. 7.Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie Klinik Zentralinstitut für seelische GesundheitMannheimGermany
  8. 8.Orchard House Sussex Weald and Downs NHS TrustChichester PO19 4PQUK
  9. 9.Leicestershire and Rutland Healthcare TrustThurmaston, Leicester LE4 8PQUK
  10. 10.Ashurst Hospital, Department of PsychiatryLyndhurst, Southampton SO40 7ARUK
  11. 11.The Pear Tree Centre Child and Family Therapy Service, Smallwood HouseRedditch, Worcestershire B97 4BDUK
  12. 12.PrivatpraxisAschaffenburgGermany