JBIC Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 2–12

Metal ion ligands in hyperaccumulating plants

  • Damien L. Callahan
  • Alan J. M. Baker
  • Spas D. Kolev
  • Anthony G. Wedd
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DOI: 10.1007/s00775-005-0056-7

Cite this article as:
Callahan, D.L., Baker, A.J.M., Kolev, S.D. et al. J Biol Inorg Chem (2006) 11: 2. doi:10.1007/s00775-005-0056-7

Abstract

Metal-hyperaccumulating plants have the ability to take up extraordinary quantities of certain metal ions without succumbing to toxic effects. Most hyperaccumulators select for particular metals but the mechanisms of selection are not understood at the molecular level. While there are many metal-binding biomolecules, this review focuses only on ligands that have been reported to play a role in sequestering, transporting or storing the accumulated metal. These include citrate, histidine and the phytosiderophores. The metal detoxification role of metallothioneins and phytochelatins in plants is also discussed.

Keywords

Plant ligandsSelectivityTransportStorageNicotianamine

Abbreviations

Ala

Alanine

Arg

Arginine

Asn

Asparagine

Asp

Aspartic acid

Cys

Cysteine

EXAFS

Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

Gln

Glutamine

Glu

Glutamic acid

Gly

Glycine

His

Histidine

Ile

Isolucine

Leu

Leucine

Lys

Lysine

MT

Metallothionein

NA

Nicotianamine

NAAT

Nicotianamine aminotransferase

NAS

Nicotianamine synthase

NiCoTs

Ni/Cobalt transporters

PC

Phytochelatin

Phe

Phenylalanine

Pro

Proline

PS

Phytosiderophores

SAM

S-adenosyl-methionine

Ser

Serine

Thr

Threonine

Tyr

Tyrosine

Val

Valine

XAS

X-ray absorption spectroscopy

Copyright information

© SBIC 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Damien L. Callahan
    • 1
  • Alan J. M. Baker
    • 2
  • Spas D. Kolev
    • 1
  • Anthony G. Wedd
    • 1
  1. 1.School of ChemistryThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.School of BotanyThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia