Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 86–90

Risk factors for osteoporosis in men

  • Kyoko Izumotani
  • Satoshi Hagiwara
  • Tsuyoshi Izumotani
  • Takami Miki
  • Hirotoshi Morii
  • Yoshiki Nishizawa

DOI: 10.1007/s007740300014

Cite this article as:
Izumotani, K., Hagiwara, S., Izumotani, T. et al. J Bone Miner Metab (2003) 21: 86. doi:10.1007/s007740300014

Abstract.

 We evaluated the risk factors for osteoporosis in men. The subjects of this study consisted of 686 healthy middle-aged (40–59 years) men who had undergone bone mineral density (BMD) measurement and medical examination, including physical strength. BMD of L2-4 was measured at the anterior-posterior position, using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Physical investigations, such as height, weight, and physical strength, were carried out on the examination day. Details of tobacco and alcohol consumption, exercise, and food intake were described on a questionnaire completed by the subjects. Sixty-five (9.5%) of the 686 subjects had a BMD less than 2.5 SD below the peak bone mass (PBM), 182 (26.5%) had a BMD between 1 SD and 2.5 SD below the PBM; and 439 (64.0%) had a BMD no less than 1 SD below the PBM. Body mass index (BMI) and leg strength were significant positive determinants of BMD, and smoking was a significant negative determinant on multiple regression analysis, with a coefficient of determination of 9.5%. Calcium intake, exercise, and alcohol consumption were not significant determinants of BMD. These results suggest that poor lifestyle behaviors (i.e., smoking) accelerate the reduction of bone density.

Key words alcohol bone mineral density (BMD) exercise men osteoporosis smoking 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kyoko Izumotani
    • 1
  • Satoshi Hagiwara
    • 2
  • Tsuyoshi Izumotani
    • 1
  • Takami Miki
    • 3
  • Hirotoshi Morii
    • 4
  • Yoshiki Nishizawa
    • 1
  1. 1. Osaka City University Graduate School, Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka, JapanJP
  2. 2. Matsushita Health Care Center, Moriguchi, JapanJP
  3. 3. Osaka City University Graduate School, Department of Geriatrics, Osaka, JapanJP
  4. 4. Aino Gakuin College, Ibaraki, JapanJP