, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 463-469

Effects of pubertal development, height, weight, and grip strength on the bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and hip in peripubertal Japanese children: Kyoto kids increase density in the skeleton study (Kyoto KIDS study)

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

The effects of growth and pubertal development on the bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and hip in peripubertal Japanese children were studied as a basis for evaluating the effects of modifiable factors on bone mass gain. The study comprised bone mass measurements in the lumbar spine (L2–4), femoral neck, and total hip using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as well as body size measurements and detailed interviews on medical history and pubertal status. The subjects were 404 first-grade students in three junior high schools (129 boys and 275 girls, mean age 12.8 ± 0.3 years) with no diseases or medication that would affect bone metabolism. BMD at each site showed an increasing trend with physical growth and sexual maturity. Significant positive correlations were observed between BMD at every skeletal site and height, weight, and grip strength in pre- and postpubertal boys and girls. In multiple regression analyses, pubertal development had a significant positive independent effect on BMD at every skeletal site in girls, but not in boys. Physical and pubertal development showed major effects on BMD, but the magnitude of these effects differed in boys and girls, even if they were of the same age. We conclude that confounding factors due to physical and pubertal development should be taken into consideration in different ways for boys and girls in investigations on the effects of environmental or behavioral factors on bone mass acquisition in peripubertal children.