Archives of Women's Mental Health

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 279–291

ISPMD consensus on the management of premenstrual disorders

  • Tracy Nevatte
  • Patrick Michael Shaughn O’Brien
  • Torbjorn Bäckström
  • Candace Brown
  • Lorraine Dennerstein
  • Jean Endicott
  • C. Neill Epperson
  • Elias Eriksson
  • Ellen W. Freeman
  • Uriel Halbreich
  • Khalid Ismail
  • Nicholas Panay
  • Teri Pearlstein
  • Andrea Rapkin
  • Robert Reid
  • David Rubinow
  • Peter Schmidt
  • Meir Steiner
  • John Studd
  • Inger Sundström-Poromaa
  • Kimberly Yonkers
  • Consensus Group of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00737-013-0346-y

Cite this article as:
Nevatte, T., O’Brien, P.M.S., Bäckström, T. et al. Arch Womens Ment Health (2013) 16: 279. doi:10.1007/s00737-013-0346-y

Abstract

The second consensus meeting of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD) took place in London during March 2011. The primary goal was to evaluate the published evidence and consider the expert opinions of the ISPMD members to reach a consensus on advice for the management of premenstrual disorders. Gynaecologists, psychiatrists, psychologists and pharmacologists each formally presented the evidence within their area of expertise; this was followed by an in-depth discussion leading to consensus recommendations. This article provides a comprehensive review of the outcomes from the meeting. The group discussed and agreed that careful diagnosis based on the recommendations and classification derived from the first ISPMD consensus conference is essential and should underlie the appropriate management strategy. Options for the management of premenstrual disorders fall under two broad categories, (a) those influencing central nervous activity, particularly the modulation of the neurotransmitter serotonin and (b) those that suppress ovulation. Psychotropic medication, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, probably acts by dampening the influence of sex steroids on the brain. Oral contraceptives, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, danazol and estradiol all most likely function by ovulation suppression. The role of oophorectomy was also considered in this respect. Alternative therapies are also addressed, with, e.g. cognitive behavioural therapy, calcium supplements and Vitex agnus castus warranting further exploration.

Keywords

Premenstrual syndromePremenstrual dysphoric disorderVariant premenstrual disorderCore premenstrual disorderPremenstrual exacerbationPMSPMDD

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tracy Nevatte
    • 1
  • Patrick Michael Shaughn O’Brien
    • 2
  • Torbjorn Bäckström
    • 3
  • Candace Brown
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Lorraine Dennerstein
    • 7
  • Jean Endicott
    • 8
  • C. Neill Epperson
    • 9
    • 10
    • 11
  • Elias Eriksson
    • 12
  • Ellen W. Freeman
    • 13
    • 14
  • Uriel Halbreich
    • 15
  • Khalid Ismail
    • 16
  • Nicholas Panay
    • 17
  • Teri Pearlstein
    • 18
  • Andrea Rapkin
    • 19
  • Robert Reid
    • 20
  • David Rubinow
    • 21
  • Peter Schmidt
    • 22
  • Meir Steiner
    • 23
  • John Studd
    • 24
  • Inger Sundström-Poromaa
    • 25
  • Kimberly Yonkers
    • 26
    • 27
    • 28
  • Consensus Group of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders
  1. 1.Institute for Science and Technology in MedicineKeele UniversityStoke on TrentUK
  2. 2.Academic Unit of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital North StaffordshireKeele University School of MedicineStoke on TrentUK
  3. 3.Umea Neurosteroid Research Center, Department of Clinical SciencesNorrland University HospitalUmeaSweden
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Tennessee Health Science CentreMemphisUSA
  5. 5.Department of ObstetricsUniversity of Tennessee Health Science CentreMemphisUSA
  6. 6.Department of GynaecologyUniversity of Tennessee Health Science CentreMemphisUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Melbourne and National Ageing Research InstituteMelbourneAustralia
  8. 8.Department of PsychiatryColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  9. 9.Department of PsychiatryPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  10. 10.Department of ObstetricsPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  11. 11.Department of GynecologyPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  12. 12.Institute of Neuroscience and PhysiologyGöteberg UniversityGötebergSweden
  13. 13.Department of Obstetrics/GynecologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  14. 14.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  15. 15.State University of New York at Buffalo and WPANew YorkUSA
  16. 16.School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Birmingham Women’s Foundation Trust, College of Medical and Dental SciencesUniversity of BirminghamEdgbastonUK
  17. 17.Queen Charlotte’s and Chelsea and Westminster HospitalsImperial College LondonLondonUK
  18. 18.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  19. 19.Department of Obstetrics and GenecologyDavid Geffen School of Medicine at University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  20. 20.Queen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  21. 21.University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  22. 22.Section on Behavioral EndocrinologyNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  23. 23.Department of Psychiatry, Behavioural Neurosciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St Joseph’s HealthcareMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  24. 24.Department of GynaecologyChelsea and Westminster HospitalLondonUK
  25. 25.Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Obstetrics and GynaecologyUUUppsalaSweden
  26. 26.Department of PsychiatryNew HavenUSA
  27. 27.Department of ObstetricsNew HavenUSA
  28. 28.Department of GynaecologyNew HavenUSA