Review Article

Amino Acids

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 685-691

First online:

A role for anti-transglutaminase 2 autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease?

  • K. LindforsAffiliated withPaediatric Research Centre, Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital
  • , K. KaukinenAffiliated withMedical School and Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital
  • , M. MäkiAffiliated withPaediatric Research Centre, Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital Email author 

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Abstract

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune-mediated disorder with both innate and adaptive immune components. The disease is triggered by dietary gluten, which provokes the development of a massive immune reaction leading to the destruction of the small-intestinal mucosal morphology and intestinal dysfunction. Besides the typical small-bowel symptoms extraintestinal manifestations may also arise in a subset of coeliac disease patients. In addition, gluten evokes the production of antibodies mainly targeting deamidated gluten peptides or transglutaminase 2. Although coeliac disease has traditionally been regarded as a T cell-mediated disorder, this review discusses the role of the gluten-induced disease-specific anti-transglutaminase 2-autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of the disease.

Keywords

Coeliac disease Transglutaminase 2 Autoantibodies Pathogenesis