Amino Acids

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 241–252

Polyamines and mRNA stability in regulation of intestinal mucosal growth

  • J.-Y. Wang
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00726-007-0518-z

Cite this article as:
Wang, JY. Amino Acids (2007) 33: 241. doi:10.1007/s00726-007-0518-z

Summary.

The mammalian intestinal epithelium is a rapidly self-renewing tissue in the body, and its homeostasis is preserved through strict regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. Polyamines are necessary for normal intestinal mucosal growth and decreasing cellular polyamines inhibits cell proliferation and disrupts epithelial integrity. An increasing body of evidence indicates that polyamines regulate intestinal epithelial cell renewal by virtue of their ability to modulate expression of various genes and that growth inhibition following polyamine depletion results primarily from the activation of growth-inhibiting genes rather than a simple decrease in expression of growth-promoting genes. In this review article, we will focus on changes in expression of growth-inhibiting genes following polyamine depletion and further analyze in some detail the mechanisms through which mRNA stability is regulated by RNA-binding proteins.

Keywords: Intestinal epithelium – Cell proliferation and growth arrest – Posttranscriptional regulation – mRNA stability – RNA-binding proteins

Abbreviations:

AMPK

AMP-activated protein kinase

AP-1

activator protein-1

co-Smad

common-Smad

CR

coding region

CRE

cAMP responsive element

C-siRNA

control siRNA

DENSPM

N1, N11-diethylnorspermdine

DFMO

D,L-α-difluoromethylornithine

IEC

intestinal epithelial cell

I-Smads

inhibitory Smads

NPM

necleophosmin

ODC

ornithine decarboxylase

Q-PCR

real-time quantitative PCR

R-Smads

receptor-regulated Smads

siHuR

siRNA targeting HuR mRNA

siRNA

small interfering RNA

TGF-β

transforming growth factor-β

TGFβRII

TGF-β type II receptor

TRE

TPA responsive element

3′-UTRs

3′-untranslated regions

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • J.-Y. Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Cell Biology Group, Departments of Surgery and PathologyUniversity of Maryland School of Medicine and Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical CenterBaltimoreUSA