Amino Acids

, Volume 32, Issue 3, pp 381–386

Effects of β-alanine supplementation on the onset of neuromuscular fatigue and ventilatory threshold in women

  • J. R. Stout
  • J. T. Cramer
  • R. F. Zoeller
  • D. Torok
  • P. Costa
  • J. R. Hoffman
  • R. C. Harris
  • J. O’Kroy
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00726-006-0474-z

Cite this article as:
Stout, J., Cramer, J., Zoeller, R. et al. Amino Acids (2007) 32: 381. doi:10.1007/s00726-006-0474-z

Summary.

This study examined the effects of 28 days of β-alanine supplementation on the physical working capacity at fatigue threshold (PWCFT), ventilatory threshold (VT), maximal oxygen consumption (\(\dot{\rm V}\)O2-MAX), and time-to-exhaustion (TTE) in women. Twenty-two women (age ± SD 27.4 ± 6.1 yrs) participated and were randomly assigned to either the β-alanine (CarnoSyn™) or Placebo (PL) group. Before (pre) and after (post) the supplementation period, participants performed a continuous, incremental cycle ergometry test to exhaustion to determine the PWCFT, VT, \(\dot{\rm V}\)O2-MAX, and TTE. There was a 13.9, 12.6 and 2.5% increase (p < 0.05) in VT, PWCFT, and TTE, respectively, for the β-alanine group, with no changes in the PL (p > 0.05). There were no changes for \(\dot{\rm V}\)O2-MAX (p > 0.05) in either group. Results of this study indicate that β-alanine supplementation delays the onset of neuromuscular fatigue (PWCFT) and the ventilatory threshold (VT) at submaximal workloads, and increase in TTE during maximal cycle ergometry performance. However, β-alanine supplementation did not affect maximal aerobic power (\(\dot{\rm V}\)O2-MAX). In conclusion, β-alanine supplementation appears to improve submaximal cycle ergometry performance and TTE in young women, perhaps as a result of an increased buffering capacity due to elevated muscle carnosine concentrations.

Keywords: Carnosine – β-Alanine – Ergogenic aids – Electromyography – Cycle ergometry

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Stout
    • 1
  • J. T. Cramer
    • 1
  • R. F. Zoeller
    • 2
  • D. Torok
    • 2
  • P. Costa
    • 2
  • J. R. Hoffman
    • 3
  • R. C. Harris
    • 4
  • J. O’Kroy
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Health and Exercise ScienceUniversity of OklahomaNormanU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of Exercise Science and Health PromotionFlorida Atlantic UniversityDavieU.S.A.
  3. 3.Department of Health and Exercise ScienceThe College of New JerseyEwingU.S.A.
  4. 4.School of Sport Exercise and Health SciencesUniversity of ChichesterChichesterU.K.