Archives of Virology

, Volume 157, Issue 2, pp 235–246

A549 and PLC/PRF/5 cells can support the efficient propagation of swine and wild boar hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains: demonstration of HEV infectivity of porcine liver sold as food

Authors

  • Hideyuki Takahashi
    • Division of Virology, Department of Infection and ImmunityJichi Medical University School of Medicine
    • Lymphotec Inc.
  • Toshinori Tanaka
    • Division of Virology, Department of Infection and ImmunityJichi Medical University School of Medicine
  • Suljid Jirintai
    • Division of Virology, Department of Infection and ImmunityJichi Medical University School of Medicine
  • Shigeo Nagashima
    • Division of Virology, Department of Infection and ImmunityJichi Medical University School of Medicine
  • Masaharu Takahashi
    • Division of Virology, Department of Infection and ImmunityJichi Medical University School of Medicine
  • Tsutomu Nishizawa
    • Division of Virology, Department of Infection and ImmunityJichi Medical University School of Medicine
  • Hitoshi Mizuo
    • Department of Internal MedicineKin-ikyo Chuo Hospital
  • Yasuyuki Yazaki
    • Center for GastroenterologyKobayashi Hospital
    • Division of Virology, Department of Infection and ImmunityJichi Medical University School of Medicine
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00705-011-1153-2

Cite this article as:
Takahashi, H., Tanaka, T., Jirintai, S. et al. Arch Virol (2012) 157: 235. doi:10.1007/s00705-011-1153-2

Abstract

Recent evidence has indicated the cross-species transmission of hepatitis E virus (HEV) from pigs and wild boars to humans, causing zoonosis, mostly via consumption of uncooked or undercooked animal meat/viscera. However, no efficient cell culture system for swine and boar HEV strains has been established. We inoculated A549 cells with 12 swine and boar HEV strains of liver, feces, or serum origin at an HEV load of ≥2.0 × 104 copies per well and found that the HEV progeny replicated as efficiently as human HEV strains, with a maximum load of ~108 copies/ml. However, the HEV load in the culture medium at 30 days post-inoculation differed markedly by inoculum, ranging from 1.0 × 102 to 1.1 × 107 copies/ml upon inoculation at a lower load of approximately 105 copies per well. All progeny were passaged successfully onto A549 and PLC/PRF/5 cells. In sharp contrast, no progeny viruses were detectable in the culture supernatant upon inoculation with 13 swine and boar HEV strains at an HEV load of <1.8 × 104 copies per well. The present study also demonstrates that swine liver sold as food can be infectious, supporting the risk of zoonotic food-borne HEV infection.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011