Archives of Virology

, 156:1641

Molecular epidemiology of norovirus gastroenteritis in children in Jiangmen, China, 2005–2007

  • Ying-chun Dai
  • Gui-fang Hu
  • Xu-fu Zhang
  • Can-lei Song
  • Wen-long Xiang
  • Xian-bo Wu
  • Le-yi Wang
  • Xi Jiang
  • Jun Nie
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s00705-011-1010-3

Cite this article as:
Dai, Y., Hu, G., Zhang, X. et al. Arch Virol (2011) 156: 1641. doi:10.1007/s00705-011-1010-3

Abstract

Human noroviruses (NoVs) are an important cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis. Their role in sporadic cases, however, is less clear. In this study, we performed a two-year surveillance (September 2005 to August 2007) of NoV gastroenteritis in outpatient clinics in a southern city of China, Jiangmen City. NoVs were detected in 115 patients (115/881, 13.1%) with 30 (26.1%) co-infections with rotaviruses. Sequence analysis showed that all 115 NoVs belonged to genogroup II, with GII.4 being the most predominant (87.8%). NoV-associated infection can be seen year-around, with autumn and winter peaks. This study provides basic information on sporadic cases of major NoV gastroenteritis in children in different seasons, which is valuable for future disease control and prevention.

Keywords

NorovirusCalicivirusAcute gastroenteritisDiarrheaSporadic casesRecombinant

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ying-chun Dai
    • 1
  • Gui-fang Hu
    • 1
  • Xu-fu Zhang
    • 2
  • Can-lei Song
    • 1
  • Wen-long Xiang
    • 1
  • Xian-bo Wu
    • 1
  • Le-yi Wang
    • 3
  • Xi Jiang
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jun Nie
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical MedicineSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Traditional Chinese MedicineSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Division of Infectious DiseasesCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  4. 4.Department of Pediatrics, College of MedicineUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA