Archives of Virology

, 153:2197

Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus in an isolated Afro-Brazilian community

  • A. R. C. Motta-Castro
  • R. M. B. Martins
  • N. M. Araujo
  • C. Niel
  • G. B. Facholi
  • B. V. Lago
  • F. C. A. Mello
  • S. A. Gomes
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00705-008-0237-0

Cite this article as:
Motta-Castro, A.R.C., Martins, R.M.B., Araujo, N.M. et al. Arch Virol (2008) 153: 2197. doi:10.1007/s00705-008-0237-0
  • 139 Views

Abstract

This study was conducted in an Afro-Brazilian, slave-descendant community with high (42.4%) hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevalence. Twenty (8.4%) out of the 239 subjects under study were HBsAg-positive, and HBV-DNA was detected in 59 (25%) individuals. A high rate (18.3%) of occult infection was therefore observed that was associated to low HBV loads (mean, 1.8 × 104 copies/ml) and to a specific amino acid substitution (C100Y) in the small surface antigen. Genotyping of 50 isolates showed that 43 (86%) were of subgenotype A1, one (2%) from subgenotype A2, and five (10%) from subgenotype D. Mixed genotypes A1 and E were observed in one (2%) sample. The genetic distance (0.8 ± 0.3%) among the HBV/A1 isolates from the community was smaller than the intragroup divergence among A1 isolates from Brazil as a whole, but it was similar to that found between A2 isolates from different countries, suggesting that HBV/A1 was introduced in the community through different sources. The substitution W501R (polymerase), previously reported only in Gambia, was observed in 46% of the HBV/A1 isolates. The precore/core promoter region of HBsAg-positive isolates showed several substitutions that could explain the anti-HBe phenotype found in 18 of 20 (90%) of the HBsAg-positive subjects.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. C. Motta-Castro
    • 1
    • 3
  • R. M. B. Martins
    • 2
  • N. M. Araujo
    • 3
  • C. Niel
    • 3
  • G. B. Facholi
    • 1
  • B. V. Lago
    • 3
  • F. C. A. Mello
    • 3
  • S. A. Gomes
    • 3
  1. 1.Departamento de Farmácia-Bioquímica, Laboratório de Imunologia CínicaUniversidade Federal de Mato Grosso do SulCampo GrandeBrazil
  2. 2.Instituto de Patologia Tropical e Saúde-PúblicaUniversidade Federal de GoiásGoiâniaBrazil
  3. 3.Laboratório de Virologia MolecularInstituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZManguinhos, Rio de JaneiroBrazil