Archives of Virology

, Volume 148, Issue 10, pp 2023–2037

Bovine herpesvirus 1 interferes with TAP-dependent peptide transport and intracellular trafficking of MHC class I molecules in human cells

  • D. Koppers-Lalic
  • M. Rychlowski
  • D. van Leeuwen
  • F. A. M. Rijsewijk
  • M. E. Ressing
  • J. J. Neefjes
  • K. Bienkowska-Szewczyk
  • E. J. H. J. Wiertz

DOI: 10.1007/s00705-003-0142-5

Cite this article as:
Koppers-Lalic, D., Rychlowski, M., van Leeuwen, D. et al. Arch Virol (2003) 148: 2023. doi:10.1007/s00705-003-0142-5
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Summary.

Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), the cause of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in cattle, establishes a lifelong infection, despite the presence of antiviral immunity in the host. BoHV-1 has been shown to elude the host immune system, but the viral gene products responsible for this interference have not yet been identified. Studies aiming at the identification of BoHV-1-encoded immune evasion genes have been hampered by the lack of bovine-specific immunological reagents. Some of the immune evasion molecules identified for other herpesviruses are host species specific; others can act across the species barrier. In this study, experiments were performed to investigate whether BoHV-1 can infect human cells and interfere with antigen processing and presentation in these cells. A human melanoma cell line, Mel JuSo, appeared to be permissive for BoHV-1 infection. BoHV-1 induced expression of major viral glycoproteins at the surface of these cells and produced progeny virus up to 105 plaque forming units per ml. BoHV-1 infection resulted in impaired intracellular transport of human MHC class I molecules and inhibition of human TAP. These data indicate that the BoHV-1-encoded molecule(s) that block antigen presentation in bovine cells are able to interact with homologous components of the human MHC class I presentation pathway. The fact that immune evasion by BoHV-1 can be studied in human cells will facilitate the identification of the BoHV-1 gene products involved in this process. Moreover, the data presented here suggest that the BoHV-1 encoded inhibitors of antigen presentation represent potential immune suppressive agents for use in humans.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Koppers-Lalic
    • 1
  • M. Rychlowski
    • 2
  • D. van Leeuwen
    • 1
  • F. A. M. Rijsewijk
    • 3
  • M. E. Ressing
    • 1
  • J. J. Neefjes
    • 4
  • K. Bienkowska-Szewczyk
    • 2
  • E. J. H. J. Wiertz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Microbiology, Center of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The NetherlandsNL
  2. 2.Department of Molecular Virology, University of Gdansk, Gdansk, PolandPL
  3. 3.Division of Infectious Diseases and Food Chain Quality, Lelystad, The NetherlandsNL
  4. 4.Division of Tumor Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsNL