Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 107, Issue 5, pp 563–579

CSF levels of tau, β-amyloid1–42 and GAP-43 in frontotemporal dementia, other types of dementia and normal aging

  • M. Sjögren
  • L. Minthon
  • P. Davidsson
  • A. -K. Granérus
  • A. Clarberg
  • H. Vanderstichele
  • E. Vanmechelen
  • A. Wallin
  • K. Blennow

DOI: 10.1007/s007020070079

Cite this article as:
Sjögren, M., Minthon, L., Davidsson, P. et al. J Neural Transm (2000) 107: 563. doi:10.1007/s007020070079

Summary.

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau, β-amyloid1–42 and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) were studied in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD; n = 17), Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 60), subcortical white-matter dementia (SWD; n = 24), Parkinson's disease (PD; n = 23) and dysthymia (n = 19) and in age-matched controls (n = 32). CSF-tau was significantly increased only in AD, and CSF-β-amyloid1–42 was significantly decreased in AD and SWD as compared to controls, and in AD compared to FTD. CSF-GAP-43 was significantly decreased only in PD. The GAP-43/tau ratio was decreased in all the patient groups except the dysthymia group compared to controls. A positive correlation was found between CSF-GAP-43 and CSF-tau in all groups. The results suggest normal levels of CSF-tau and CSF-β-amyloid1–42 in FTD, which will aid in the clinical separation of FTD from AD. In SWD, decreased levels of CSF-β-amyloid1–42 suggest concomitant involvement of vascular and amyloid protein mechanisms.

Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, subcortical, white matter, Parkinson's disease, cerebrospinal fluid, GAP-43, tau, β-amyloid, biochemical marker.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Sjögren
    • 1
  • L. Minthon
    • 2
  • P. Davidsson
    • 1
  • A. -K. Granérus
    • 3
  • A. Clarberg
    • 2
  • H. Vanderstichele
    • 4
  • E. Vanmechelen
    • 4
  • A. Wallin
    • 1
  • K. Blennow
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Göbteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, MölndalSE
  2. 2.Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Neuropsychiatric Clinic, Malmö University Hospital, MalmöSE
  3. 3.Department of Geriatrics, University of Health Sciences, Linköping, SwedenSE
  4. 4.Innogenetics, Ghent, BelgiumBE
  5. 5.Medical Research Council, SwedenSE