Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 117, Issue 6, pp 699–705

Increased dopaminergic neurotransmission in therapy-naïve asymptomatic HIV patients is not associated with adaptive changes at the dopaminergic synapses

  • C. Scheller
  • G. Arendt
  • T. Nolting
  • C. Antke
  • S. Sopper
  • M. Maschke
  • M. Obermann
  • A. Angerer
  • I. W. Husstedt
  • F. Meisner
  • E. Neuen-Jacob
  • H. W. Müller
  • P. Carey
  • V. ter Meulen
  • P. Riederer
  • E. Koutsilieri
Basic Neurosciences, Genetics and Immunology - Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-010-0415-6

Cite this article as:
Scheller, C., Arendt, G., Nolting, T. et al. J Neural Transm (2010) 117: 699. doi:10.1007/s00702-010-0415-6

Abstract

Central dopaminergic (DA) systems are affected during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. So far, it is believed that they degenerate with progression of HIV disease because deterioration of DA systems is evident in advanced stages of infection. In this manuscript we found that (a) DA levels are increased and DA turnover is decreased in CSF of therapy-naïve HIV patients in asymptomatic infection, (b) DA increase does not modulate the availability of DA transporters and D2-receptors, (c) DA correlates inversely with CD4+ numbers in blood. These findings show activation of central DA systems without development of adaptive responses at DA synapses in asymptomatic HIV infection. It is probable that DA deterioration in advanced stages of HIV infection may derive from increased DA availability in early infection, resulting in DA neurotoxicity. Our findings provide a clue to the synergism between DA medication or drugs of abuse and HIV infection to exacerbate and accelerate HIV neuropsychiatric disease, a central issue in the neurobiology of HIV.

Keywords

HIV Dopamine CSF Receptors Transporters Infection 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Scheller
    • 1
  • G. Arendt
    • 2
  • T. Nolting
    • 2
  • C. Antke
    • 3
  • S. Sopper
    • 4
  • M. Maschke
    • 5
  • M. Obermann
    • 5
  • A. Angerer
    • 5
  • I. W. Husstedt
    • 6
  • F. Meisner
    • 1
  • E. Neuen-Jacob
    • 7
  • H. W. Müller
    • 3
  • P. Carey
    • 8
  • V. ter Meulen
    • 1
  • P. Riederer
    • 9
  • E. Koutsilieri
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Virology and ImmunobiologyUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgGermany
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital of DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity of DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  4. 4.German Primate CenterGöttingenGermany
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital of Duisburg-EssenDuisburg-EssenGermany
  6. 6.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital of MünsterMünsterGermany
  7. 7.Institute of NeuropathologyUniversity of DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  8. 8.Department of PsychiatryStellenbosch UniversityCape TownSouth Africa
  9. 9.Clinical Neurochemistry, National Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and PsychotherapyUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgGermany

Personalised recommendations