Journal of Neural Transmission

, 115:1527

Baroreflex sensitivity and power spectral analysis in different extrapyramidal syndromes

  • C. Friedrich
  • H. Rüdiger
  • C. Schmidt
  • B. Herting
  • S. Prieur
  • S. Junghanns
  • K. Schweitzer
  • C. Globas
  • L. Schöls
  • D. Berg
  • H. Reichmann
  • T. Ziemssen
Parkinson's Disease and Allied Conditions - Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-008-0127-3

Cite this article as:
Friedrich, C., Rüdiger, H., Schmidt, C. et al. J Neural Transm (2008) 115: 1527. doi:10.1007/s00702-008-0127-3

Abstract

Cardiac autonomic abnormalities have been described in Parkinson’s disease and other extrapyramidal syndromes. To investigate baroreflex sensitivity as an important risk marker of cardiovascular mortality in patients with Parkinson’s disease and other extrapyramidal syndromes. We recorded continuously blood pressure, ECG and respiration in 35 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), 32 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 46 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) and in 27 corresponding healthy subjects (Con). Recordings of 2 min at rest were used to calculate baroreflex and spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic blood pressure. Resting baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was significantly lower in the MSA and the PSP group but not in the PD group in comparison to the Con group. With increasing Hoehn & Yahr stage, BRS significantly decreased in all patient groups. In spectral analysis, all patient groups had a significantly lower relative low frequency (LF)-band power than the healthy controls. Patients with extrapyramidal disorders frequently demonstrate pathologically decreased BRS values and abnormalities of spectral analysis. This may have fundamental impact on the cardiovascular prognosis of patients with extrapyramidal disease.

Keywords

Autonomic dysfunctionBaroreflex sensitivityExtrapyramidal diseaseSpectral analysis

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Friedrich
    • 1
  • H. Rüdiger
    • 1
  • C. Schmidt
    • 1
  • B. Herting
    • 2
  • S. Prieur
    • 1
  • S. Junghanns
    • 2
  • K. Schweitzer
    • 3
  • C. Globas
    • 3
  • L. Schöls
    • 3
  • D. Berg
    • 3
  • H. Reichmann
    • 2
  • T. Ziemssen
    • 1
  1. 1.Autonomic and Neuroendocrinological Laboratory, Department of NeurologyUniversity Clinic Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of TechnologyDresdenGermany
  2. 2.Movement Disorders Research Group, Department of NeurologyUniversity Clinic Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of TechnologyDresdenGermany
  3. 3.Department of Neurodegeneration, Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain ResearchUniversity of TübingenTübingenGermany