Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 115, Issue 10, pp 1413–1430

Neuroproteomics as a promising tool in Parkinson’s disease research

  • Ilse S. Pienaar
  • William M. U. Daniels
  • Jürgen Götz
Parkinson's Disease and Allied Conditions - Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-008-0070-3

Cite this article as:
Pienaar, I.S., Daniels, W.M.U. & Götz, J. J Neural Transm (2008) 115: 1413. doi:10.1007/s00702-008-0070-3

Abstract

Despite the vast number of studies on Parkinson’s disease (PD), its effective diagnosis and treatment remains unsatisfactory. Hence, the relentless search for an optimal cure continues. The emergence of neuroproteomics, with its sophisticated techniques and non-biased ability to quantify proteins, provides a methodology with which to study the changes in neurons that are associated with neurodegeneration. Neuroproteomics is an emerging tool to establish disease-associated protein profiles, while also generating a greater understanding as to how these proteins interact and undergo post-translational modifications. Furthermore, due to the advances made in bioinformatics, insight is created concerning their functional characteristics. In this review, we first summarize the most prominent proteomics techniques and then discuss the major advances in the fast-growing field of neuroproteomics in PD. Ultimately, it is hoped that the application of this technology will lead towards a presymptomatic diagnosis of PD, and the identification of risk factors and new therapeutic targets at which pharmacological intervention can be aimed.

Keywords

Alzheimer’s disease Biomarker Cerebrospinal fluid Mass spectrometry Neurodegenerative disease Neuroproteomics Parkinson’s disease 

Abbreviations

SNCA

Alpha-synuclein

AD

Alzheimer’s disease

SDS

Dodecyl sulphate

DA

Dopamine

ESI

Electrospray ionization

L-DOPA

Levodopa

LB

Lewy bodies

MS

Mass spectrometry

MPTP

1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine

6-OHDA

Parkinson’s disease

PD

6-Hydroxydopamine

SNpc

Substantia Nigra pars compacta

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ilse S. Pienaar
    • 1
    • 2
  • William M. U. Daniels
    • 3
  • Jürgen Götz
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Medical PhysiologyUniversity of StellenboschMatielandSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of Physiology, Anatomy and GeneticsUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  3. 3.School of MedicineUniversity of Kwazulu-NatalDurbanSouth Africa
  4. 4.Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease Laboratory, Brain and Mind Research InstituteUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia