Journal of Neural Transmission

, 114:1147

L-dopa dose and the duration and severity of dyskinesia in primed MPTP-treated primates

  • M. Kuoppamäki
  • G. Al-Barghouthy
  • M. J. Jackson
  • L. A. Smith
  • N. Quinn
  • P. Jenner
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-007-0727-3

Cite this article as:
Kuoppamäki, M., Al-Barghouthy, G., Jackson, M. et al. J Neural Transm (2007) 114: 1147. doi:10.1007/s00702-007-0727-3

Summary

Most patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) develop dyskinesia and other motor complications after prolonged L-dopa use. We now report on the relationship between L-dopa dose and the duration and severity of dyskinesia in L-dopa-primed MPTP-treated primates with marked nigral degeneration mimicking late stage PD. With increasing doses of L-dopa, locomotor activity increased and motor disability declined. The duration of dyskinesia following L-dopa administration increased dose-dependently, and showed a linear correlation with total locomotor activity. In addition, the time-course of dyskinesia paralleled closely that of locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, severity of dyskinesia showed a non-linear correlation with total locomotor activity, low doses of L-dopa eliciting severe dyskinesia for short periods of time. The threshold for dyskinesia induction and the antiparkinsonian effects of L-dopa appear very similar in primed MPTP primates mimicking late stage PD. Reducing individual doses of L-dopa to avoid severe dyskinesia can markedly compromise the antiparkinsonian response. Our results extend the relevance of the dyskinetic MPTP-treated primate in studying the genesis of involuntary movements occurring in L-dopa treated patients with PD.

Keywords: Marmoset, Parkinson’s disease, priming, dyskinesia, involuntary movements

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Kuoppamäki
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Al-Barghouthy
    • 1
  • M. J. Jackson
    • 1
  • L. A. Smith
    • 1
  • N. Quinn
    • 3
  • P. Jenner
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurodegenerative Diseases Research CentreKing’s CollegeLondonU.K.
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyTurku University HospitalTurkuFinland
  3. 3.Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement DisordersInstitute of NeurologyLondonU.K.