Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 113, Issue 11, pp 1763–1769

Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostic markers correlate with lower plasma copper and ceruloplasmin in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

  • H. Kessler
  • F.-G. Pajonk
  • P. Meisser
  • T. Schneider-Axmann
  • K.-H. Hoffmann
  • T. Supprian
  • W. Herrmann
  • R. Obeid
  • G. Multhaup
  • P. Falkai
  • T. A. Bayer
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-006-0485-7

Cite this article as:
Kessler, H., Pajonk, F., Meisser, P. et al. J Neural Transm (2006) 113: 1763. doi:10.1007/s00702-006-0485-7
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Summary.

Increasing evidence links Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with misbalanced Cu homeostasis. Recently, we have shown that dietary Cu supplementation in a transgenic mouse model for AD increases bioavailable brain Cu levels, restores Cu, Zn-super oxide-1 activity, prevents premature death, and lowers Aβ levels. In the present report we investigated AD patients with normal levels of Aβ42, Tau and Phospho-Tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in comparison with AD patients exhibiting aberrant levels in these CSF biomarkers. The influence of these cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diagnostic markers with primary dependent variables blood Cu, Zn and ceruloplasmin (CB) and secondary with CSF profiles of Cu, Zn and neurotransmitters was determined. Multivariate tests revealed a significant effect of factor diagnostic group (no AD diagnosis in CSF or AD diagnosis in CSF) for variables plasma Cu and CB (F = 4.80; df = 2, 23; p = 0.018). Subsequent univariate tests revealed significantly reduced plasma Cu (−12.7%; F = 7.05; df = 1, 25; p = 0.014) and CB (−14.1%; F = 9.44; df = 1, 24; p = 0.005) levels in patients with aberrant CSF biomarker concentrations. Although only AD patients were included, the reduced plasma Cu and CB levels in patients with a CSF diagnosis of advanced AD supports previous observations that a mild Cu deficiency might contribute to AD progression.

Keywords: CSF, copper, Alzheimer’s disease

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kessler
    • 1
  • F.-G. Pajonk
    • 1
  • P. Meisser
    • 1
  • T. Schneider-Axmann
    • 1
  • K.-H. Hoffmann
    • 1
  • T. Supprian
    • 1
  • W. Herrmann
    • 2
  • R. Obeid
    • 2
  • G. Multhaup
    • 3
  • P. Falkai
    • 1
  • T. A. Bayer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and PsychotherapySaarland UniversityHomburg/SaarGermany
  2. 2.Department for Clinical Chemistry, Central LaboratorySaarland University HospitalHomburg/SaarGermany
  3. 3.Institute for Chemistry-BiochemistryFree University of BerlinBerlinGermany