Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 110, Issue 5, pp 509–515

Neuroprotection by deprenyl and other propargylamines: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase rather than monoamine oxidase B

  • W. Tatton
  • R. Chalmers-Redman
  • N. Tatton
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-002-0827-z

Cite this article as:
Tatton, W., Chalmers-Redman, R. & Tatton, N. J Neural Transm (2003) 110: 509. doi:10.1007/s00702-002-0827-z

Summary.

Deprenyl and other propargylamines are clinically beneficial in Parkinson's disease (PD). The benefits were thought to depend on monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibition. A large body of research has now shown that the propargylamines increase neuronal survival independently of MAO-B inhibition by interfering with apoptosis signaling pathways. The propargylamines bind to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The GAPDH binding is associated with decreased synthesis of pro-apoptotic proteins like BAX, c-JUN and GAPDH but increased synthesis of anti-apoptotic proteins like BCL-2, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase and heat shock protein 70. Anti-apoptotic propargylamines that do not inhibit MAO-B are now in PD clinical trial.

Keywords: Deprenyl Parkinson's disease GAPDH anti-apoptosis. 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Tatton
    • 1
  • R. Chalmers-Redman
    • 1
  • N. Tatton
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USAUS

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